Western Michigan University
BlackboardEnglish 373

English 373  Reading as a Psycholinguistic Process
Spring 2003
Instructor:  Dr. Constance (Connie) Weaver




HomeCourse Description
 

This course focuses on the nature of the reading process and how to help children develop as readers.  In my sections, particular attention is paid to:
 

One major project, reading and preparing a group report on the book chosen for a Professional Book Club, can be tailored to a particular interest, such as teaching children to read in the primary grades, teaching reading strategies, establishing a readers' workshop (or readers' and writers' workshop) in the classroom, establishing and conducting literature circles at any level, helping readers at any level with their particular needs as a reader, teaching "at risk" and special needs students  in a whole language classroom, helping students develop language and literacy when English is not their native language, exploring themes with students (NOT the same as theme units), and related topics.  Possible Book Club topics for this particular semester can be inferred from the lists of books from which you have a choice.

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BlocksPrerequisites for English 373
Reading as a Psycholinguistic Process
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Texts

 

Ordering books for yourself

The required books and most of the recommended books should be available in Western's bookstore, and probably in the University Bookstore as well.  However, here are the Web addresses and telephone ordering numbers for most of the publisers. 

In many instances, the books will be described on the publisher's Web page, so you can read about them before making a decision what to order.


Amazon on-line bookstore
http://www.amazon.com    [but many of our professional books now cost much more through amazon.com]


Barnes and Noble
http://www.bn.com


Heinemann
http://www.heinemann.com
1-800-793-2154, Fax 1-800-847-0938


Stenhouse
http://www.stenhouse.com
1-800-988-9812, Fax 1-614-487-2272


Scholastic
http://www.scholastic.com
1-800-724-6527 (general number)


Harcourt Brace College Publishers
1-800-245-8744, fax 1-800-433-6303


National Council of Teachers of English
http://www.ncte.org/books (to read descriptions)
1-800-369-6283, fax 1-217-328-9645
orders@ncte.org


International Reading Association

http://www.bookstore.reading.org
1-800-336-READ, ext. 266, fax 1-302-731-1057
 

Required

Christian, Peggy.  (1995). The Bookstore Mouse.  San Diego:  Harcourt Brace.  ISBN 0-15-200203-0.  Hardback only; $16. A delightful adventure story that illuminates the nature of the reading process.

Weaver, Constance. (2002). Reading Process and Practice. ISBN 0-325-00377-7. 3rd ed. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. $35.

Relevant materials from http://www.nationalreadingpanel.org. Go to "order publications" and order, or simply print out, a free copy of Put Reading First: The Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read (58 pages) and Put Reading First: Helping Your Child to Read. You might also want the research summary, simply titled Report of the National Reading Panel . . .

NOTE: I ordered the following book as required, but then couldn't very well fit it into the reading assignments:

Routman, R. (2003). Reading Essentials: The Specifics You Need to Teach Reading Well. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.


Professional "Choice" Book: Choose One

You will need to obtain your profesional choice book on your own. Typically the best way is to order it directly from the publisher; most publishers give discounts for ordering online, so the cost with shipping & handling is about the same as the originally listed price. I haven't updated the list with current prices (if different from what's listed) or with all the links to the online book descriptions.

You'll have time in class to start looking at a much more thorough bibliography online, but here are some of my favorites:

Basic options

Allen, Janet, and Kyle Gonzalez.  (1998).  There's Room for Me Here:  Literacy Workshop in the Middle School.  York, ME:  Stenhouse.  Order # K-0042.  $ 19.50.

Allington, Richard L. ((Ed.) (2002). Big Brother and the National Reading Curriculum: How Ideology Trumped Evidence. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. A must-read book for teachers of reading, this book discusses the national reading agenda: the National Reading Panel Report, the political context of the national reports and policies, and the evidence against a national reading curriculum.

Allington, R. L. (2002). What Really Matters for Struggling Readers: Designing Research-Based Programs. New York: Addison Wesley Longman. ISBN 0-321-06396-1. This is for schools as much as for individual teachers. An important book.

Avery, Carol.  (2002).  . . . And with a Light Touch:  Learning About Reading, Writing, and Teaching with First Graders.  2nd ed. Portsmouth, NH:  Heinemann. ISBN 0-325-00066-2. [I didn't ask the bookstore to order this one.]

Carr, Janine Chappell. (1999). A Child Went Forth. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. ISBN 0-325-00171-5. Paper; about $27. Utilizing a blend of meaningful and interesting reading material, early writing practice, speaking, and explicit instruction, Carr disproves the media's insistence that American schools are typically ill-equipped to teach children from low-income neighborhoods. She describes her methods in great and practical detail--everything from getting a classroom ready for a new school year, to developing strategies for shared reading, to establishing a "writing studio." Assessment is also included. Deals with grades 1-2. [I didn't ask the bookstore to order this one.]

Dahl, Karin L., et al. (2001). Rethinking Phonics: Making the Best Teaching Decisions. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. ISBN 0-325-00356-4. Discusses "Why rethink phonics?" and includes wonderful descriptions and suggestions for teaching phonics in the context of literature, reading, and writing. URL: http://www.heinemann.com/product/E00356.asp.

Daniels, H. (2001). Literature Circles: Voice and Choice in Book Clubs & Reading Groups. (2nd ed.). Portland, ME: Stenhouse. ISBN1-57110-333-3. [Excellent choice; sorry I didn't order it in advance.]

Fisher, B. and E. Fisher-Medvic (2000). Perspectives on Shared Reading: Planning and Practice. Portsmouth, NH, Heinemann. ISBN 0-325-00215-0. $10. This is a collection of very practical and useful strategies for implementing a shared reading curriculum in pre-K through Grade 2 classrooms. The authors illustrate the correlation between classroom reading and bedtime story. The book includes discussions on organizing for shared reading, developing teaching strategies with varied texts, and inspiring student and parent participation. It also focuses on today's standards-based, testing-focused educational environment by sharing many creative suggestions for integrating shared reading with standardized curriculum demands. The two authors provide an interesting and useful contrast, since Fisher is an experienced teacher and Fisher-Medvic a new teacher.

Freeman, D., & Y. Freeman. (2000. Teaching Reading in Multilingual Classrooms. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. ISBN 0-325-00248-7. The URL for this book is http://www.heinemann.com/product/E00248.asp.

Garan, Elaine M. (2002). Resisting Reading Mandates: How to Triumph with the Truth. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. ISBN 0-325-00446-3. A must-read, though maybe later . . . [Excellent book critiquing the National Reading Panel report.]

Goodman, D. (1999). The Reading Detective Club: Solving the Mysteries of Reading, a Teacher's Guide. Portsmouth, NH, Heinemann. ISBN 0-325-00108-1. $18. Central toThe Reading Detective Club is the importance of using miscue analysis as a vital assessment tool. Readers will appreciate the accessible, practical advice for implementing miscue analysis in the classroom. Most of all, students will be reassured and inspired to learn that the detective work they do to understand language is proof that they are already smart thinkers and readers. The book is in two sections: one for teachers, which talks about the theories, and one for the students, the fun part, with activities for helping students become more effective readers.

Harvey, S. and A. Goudvis (2000). Strategies That Work: Teaching Comprehension to Enhance Understanding. York, ME, Stenhouse Publishers. ISBN 1-57110-310-4. $22.50. Strategies That Work describes instruction that is responsive to kids' interests and learning needs. When children use the strategies described,, they enjoy a more complete, thoughtful reading experience. Engagement is the goal. When this happans, kids will want to read more. The book includes a chapter on strategic reading, several chapters on strategy lessons, chapters on determining importance in nonfiction, assessing comprehension, and more. The third section contains appendices with a variety of resources, including an assessment interview for fourth-graders. Focuses on intermediate/middle grades. By one of the first staff developers of the Public Education and Business Coalition in Denver.

Hindley, Joanne.  (1996).  In the Company of Children.  York, ME:  Stenhouse.  Order # K-0010.  Paper, about $ 19.50.  Based on work with her third graders. Everybody I know who's read this book loves it!

Keefe, C. H. (1996). Label-Free Learning: Supporting Learners with Disabilities. York, ME, Stenhouse. ISBN 1-57110-023-7. $19.50. A good introduction to whole language teaching, this book focuses on how the needs of children who are, or othwerise might be, "labeled" (e.g., learning disabled, dyslexic) can be met very effectively in a regular, learner-centered whole language classroom. Deals with reading, writing, assessment, supporting diverse learners, promoting self-directed learning, evaluation, and more.

Keene, E. O., & Zimmerman, S. (1997). Mosaic of Thought: Teaching Comprehension in a Reader's Workshop. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. By oridinators of the Public Education and Business Coalition in Denver. [I did NOT have the bookstore order this one.] URL: http://www.heinemann.com/product/07237.asp.

Manning, Maryann, Gary Manning, and Roberta Long.  (1994). Theme Immersion:  Inquiry-Based Curriculum in Elementary and Middle Schools.  Portsmouth, NH:  Heinemann.  ISBN 0-435-08806-8.  Paper, about $ 25. URL: http://www.heinemann.com/product/08806.asp.

Miller, Debbie. (2002). Reading with Meaning: Teaching Comprehension in the Primary Grades. York, ME: Stenhouse. This book for the primary grades focuses on helping children use cognitive strategies to construct meaning from texts. About $21.

Routman, R. (2003). Reading Essentials: The Specifics You Need to Teach Reading Well. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Loaded with practical ideas and wisdom. Many teachers regard Routman as "the" expert on reading instruction.

Taberski, S. (2000). On Solid Ground: Strategies for Teaching Reading K-3. Portsmouth, NH, Heinemann. ISBN 0-325-00227-4. $22. Informed by current thinking and research, On Solid Ground is loaded with advice, booklists, ready-to-use reproducibles, and the words and work of real children. The book talks about teacher demonstration of reading strategies, individual conferencing, independent reading, shared and guided reading, assessment, and much more.

 

Other books on specific aspects of teaching reading: Phonics, Politics, Comprehension, etc.

Goodman, Y., & Marek, A. M. (1996). Retrospective Miscue Analysis. Katonah, NY: Richard C. Owen. Many helpful ideas for using retrospective miscue analysis as an instructional procedure.

Laminack, Lester L.  (1998).  Volunteers Working With Young Readers.  Urbana, IL:  National Council of Teachers of English.  ISBN 0-8141-3410-6.  Paper, about $14.95.  [for K-5]

Moustafa, Margaret.  (1997).  Beyond Traditional Phonics:  Research Discoveries and Reading Instruction.  Portsmouth, NH:  Heinemann.  ISBN 0-435-07247-1. $15. Beyond Traditional Phonics describes exciting discoveries about how children learn to read and relates these discoveries to reading instruction. It focuses on how children develop phonics knowledge and how we can teach phonics more effectively, but goes beyond mere phonics. An excellent and enlightening presentation.

Weaver, Constance.  (Ed.).  (1998).  Practicing What We Know:  Informed Reading Instruction.  Urbana, IL:  National Council of Teachers of English.  ISBN 0-8141-3675-3. $ 26.95. Articles on various topics, including teaching phonemic awareness and phonics, doing miscue analysis and retrospective miscue analysis, teaching reading strategies, conducting literature discussion groups, and helping struggling readers. One of NCTE's best sellers.

Weaver, Constance, Gillmeister-Krause, Lorraine, & Vento-Zogby, Grace.  (1996).  Creating Support for Effective Literacy Education.  Portsmouth, NH:  Heinemann.  ISBN 0-435-08894-7.  Paper; $34. Creating Support for Effective Literacy Education clearly conveys what we know about effective teaching and learning of literacy. Designed to be used for community and/or staff development, with its reproducible resources and other explanatory content. In the back of this book are various fact sheets on language arts issues, but you may need to consult the fact sheet index part of the book's web page to locate the newest fact sheets and to see whether some of the fact sheets have been updated since your copy of the book was printed. [This book could be very useful for you as a teaching sharing what you know with others. [I didn't have the bookstore order it this semester, but we could still do that.]

Wilde, Sandra. (2000). Miscue Analysis Made Easy: Building on Student Strengths. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. ISBN 0-325-00239-8. Paper. Drawing upon a simplified miscue form developed by Yetta Goodman and others, Wilde explains miscue analysis and offers specific examples, along with recommendations. This is different from the form developed by Weaver, though it, too, derives from the Goodmans' work.

 

Developing literacy at various grade levels: Primary through intermediate

Fisher, Bobbi.  (1998).  Joyful Learning in Kingergarten (revised edition).  Portsmouth, NH:  Heinemann.  ISBN 0-325-00038-7.  Paper, about $ 27.

Avery, Carol.  (2002).  . . . And with a Light Touch:  Learning About Reading, Writing, and Teaching with First Graders.  Portsmouth, NH:  Heinemann.

*Carr, Janine Chappell. (1999). A Child Went Forth. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. ISBN 0-325-00171-5. Paper; about $27. Focuses on grades 1 and 2.

*Hindley, Joanne.  (1996).  In the Company of Children.  York, ME:  Stenhouse.  Order # K-0010.  Paper, about $ 19.50.  Based on work with her third graders. Everybody I know who's read this book loves it! 

*Miller, Debbie. (2002). Reading with Meaning: Teaching Comprehension in the Primary Grades. York, ME: Stenhouse. This book for the primary grades focuses on helping children use cognitive strategies to construct meaning from texts. About $21.  


Developing literacy at various grade levels: Middle school and secondary

*Allen, Janet, and Kyle Gonzalez.  (1998).  There's Room for Me Here:  Literacy Workshop in the Middle School.  York, ME:  Stenhouse.  Order # K-0042.  $ 19.50.

Atwell, Nancie.  (1987).  In the Middle:  Writing, Reading, and Learning with Adolescents.  Portsmouth, NH:  Heinemann.  ISBN 0-86709-163-0.  

Atwell, Nancie.  (1998).  In the Middle:  New Understandings About Writing, Reading, and Learning (2nd ed).  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook.    ISBN 0-86709-374-9.  [over 70% new material]

Rief, Linda.  (1992).  Seeking Diversity:  Language Arts with Adolescents.  Portsmouth, NH:  Heinemann.  ISBN 0-435-08598-0.  Paper, about $ 25.

Tovani, C. (2000). I Read It, but I Don't Get I! Comprehension Strategies for Adolescent Readers. York, ME: Heinemann.

Wilhelm, J. D. (2001). Improving Comprehension with Think-Aloud Strategies. New York: Scholastic.

Wilhelm, J. D. (1997). "You Gotta BE the Book." Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.

Wilhelm, J. D., Baker, T. N., & Dube, J. (2001). Strategic Reading: Guiding Students to Lifelong Literacy. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann - Boynton/Cook.

 

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TypewriterAssignments

Major assignments:

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HandAttendance Policy

You are expected to have near-perfect attendance; more than three absences (one, for a night class) will begin to lower your course grade.  Leaving night class at break time counts as half an absence.  Excessive lates will also lower your course grade.

 

 


Abbacus  Grading

I use a "portfolio" method of grading.  You are asked to keep all of your course materials in one or more notebooks, but a professional portfolio includes more than this:  things like attendance, submitting papers on time, observations of your preparedness for and your participation in class.

In order to translate your "portfolio" into a letter grade, we use what might be called templates:  that is, descriptions of the patterns typical of those who earn an A, an AB, a B, and so forth.  The complete syllabus handed out in class will include a template for various grades, but here is my current one for an A.  Boldfacing indicates the most crucial items, while boldfaced italics indicate the next most crucial:

The person receiving an A meets most, though not necessarily all, of these criteria:

Remember that this is not exactly the criterion method of grading, where you have to meet each and every one of these criteria for an A.  In the template method, we look for the closest match.Templates for other grades are included in the course syllabus distributed in class.

The complete syllabus will include an attempt to indicate what percentage various factors will count, but I use the template method rather than the percentage method whenever the overall pattern seems reasonably clear.

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WMU  English  My home page

Contact for this page: connie.weaver@wmich.edu

Last revised: 1/5/03