Research

ACSESS: Adapted Collaborative Strategies for Evaluating Students' Strengths

Creating Career Connections: A Longitudinal Study of Student Enrollment and Outcomes of Career and Technical Education

Creating Pathways to IT Careers through High School Career and Technical Education Programs

National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC)

National Transition Alliance (NTA)

School-to-Work Connections: Nontraditional Career Opportunities for Females With and Without Disabilities


Taxonomy for Transition Programming

Transition-Related Competencies

__________________________________________________

National Transition Alliance (NTA)

1999 NTA Directory of Promising Practices and Programs for Improving Student Outcomes by Paula D. Kohler, Ph.D. and Bonnie J. Troesken, M.Ed.


Summary

Dr. Paula Kohler led the National Transition Alliance for Youth and Disabilities' (NTA) efforts to identify promising programs and practices that promote positive post-school outcomes for students with disabilities through inclusive school-to-work systems. The purpose of this initiative was to identify specific practices or programs that result in improved outcomes for students, such as development of specific skills, post-school employment, or enrollment in postsecondary education. An organization had the option to nominate (a) a specific practice or practices, such as its self-determination curriculum; or (b) a program comprised of several practices, such as its dropout prevention program or occupational skill training program. A variety of organizations submitted over 50 nominations.

In 1998-1999, we identified 27 promising programs. These programs included a variety of approaches and occured in a variety of contexts. For example, we identified two state-level initiatives that were successful in facilitating effective proactive implementation and system change, several programs that provided work-based educational experiences, two programs that focused on improving students' self-determination, and three programs that provided services and instruction to young adults with disabilities between 18 and 22.

 

Program Links

Link

Kohler, P. D. & Troesken, B. J. (1999). Improving student outcomes: Promising practices and programs for 1998-1999. [A directory of innovative approaches for providing transition services for youth with disabilities]. Champaign, IL: Transition Research Institute. University of Illinois.


__________________________________________________

2000 NTA Directory of Promising Practices and Programs for Improving Student Outcomes


Summary

Dr. Paula Kohler led the National Transition Alliance for Youth and Disabilities' (NTA) efforts to identify promising programs and positive practices that promote post-school outcomes for students with disabilities through inclusive school-to-work systems. The purpose of this initiative was to identify specific practices or programs that result in improved outcomes for students, such as development of specific skills, post-school employment, or enrollment in postsecondary education. An organization had the option to nominate (a) a specific practice or practices, such as its self-determination curriculum; or (b) a program comprised of several practices, such as its dropout prevention program or occupational skill training program. A variety of organizations submitted over 48 nominations.

In 1999-2000, we identified 20 promising programs. These programs included a variety of approaches and occured in a variety of contexts. For example, several programs provided work-based educational experiences, six programs affiliated with community colleges or universities provided transition services to those pursuing college and/or careers, and one program is produced systems change by creating hybrid agencies.

 

Program Links

Link

Kohler, P. D. & Hood, L. K.. (2000). Improving student outcomes: Promising practices and programs for 1999-2000. [A directory of innovative approaches for providing transition services for youth with disabilities]. Champaign, IL: Transition Research Institute. University of Illinois.

 


 
Copyright © 2006 Paula D. Kohler, Ph.D.
Site Design by Rachel Farabaugh
Last Updated December 20, 2006