One more sports item.  I spent the entire morning researching why Maz should NOT be in the HofF.  Or, why, if he does, Eddie Mayo belongs too.   Here's the evidence.  I've included a couple of other fairly good second sackers just so you can compare and contrast.  First, the fielding evidence:

 

 

  Total Errors Total Games Errors/Games Ratio Adjust Err/Games
Mayo 86 834 1:9.69 11.69
Maz 204 2163 1:10.60 10.60
Gordan 264 1566 1:5.93 7.93
Doerr 214 1865 1:8.71 10.71
Geh. 310 2323 1:7.49 10.49

 

 

** For each decade separating the midpoint of each player's most productive years, an adjustment factor = 1.00 is added to that player's ratio to account for the increasing size of baseball gloves;   and for the fact that as each decade passed, ground crews became more adept at removing rocks, stones, gopher holes, and hotel keys from infield dirt --- not to mention the fact that infield grass was measurably smoother as time passed.  The base decade is the 1960s, thus Mazeroski gets nothing added to his ratio since he played on qualitatively better infields with a much larger glove.  (This is fair.  Whitaker would lose 2-3 points.)

 

As you can see, Eddie Mayo clearly was a better infielder than Mazeroski --- and, in fact, was better than a couple of other Hall of Famers, Gehringer and  Doerr, as well as Joe Gordon, who Mayo himself considered to be a quality infielder.

 

Now for the offensive evidence:

 

1.  It is true that Mazeroski hit a few home runs . . .  138 . . . .and one World Series homerun that was most significant because it kept the Yankees from putting another notch on the bedpost.  (It was, in fact, less significant, from a historical perspective, than Bucky Dent's home run that kept the Red Sox from having a shot at making history by playing in the World Series in 1978.)

 

Let's keep things in perspective here.  Puddin' Head Jones had 199 home runs in his career.  He did NOT, however, hit a home run in the '50 Series against -- oh them again -- the Yankees.  Do you think if Willie

had hit one against the Yanks, he would have been voted into the Hall of Fame?  Probably not, I'd say --- although I would have voted for him, of course.

 

Here's some more data:

 

Career Pinch Hitting Record (a far better measure of clutch hitting over the course of a career than "number of home runs in the ninth inning of the final game of a World Series”):

 

    Mazeroski         13 for 60 (avg = .217)

    Mayo                12 for 44 (avg = .273)

 

 

Career Stolen Bases . . . . . I know you'll scratch your head on this one:

 

    Mazeroski         27   (=  1 every 80 games or about 2 a season)

    Mayo                29   (=  1 every 28 games or about 5 a season)  (and I'm sure had they kept statistics on

number of missed third strikes beat out that Mayo would have beat Mazeroski

on this, too)

 

 

 

 

 

KO / BB Ratio:

 

    Mazeroski     706 KO / 447 BB   (ratio = 1.58) = for every walk, Maz KO'd 1.58 times

    Mayo            175 KO / 258 BB   (ratio = 0.68) = for every walk, Mayo KO'd 0.68 times

 

 

I rest my case on one last point.  Maz' major league career was longer, but as you and I have discussed before, should longevity play a role in deciding who belongs in the H of Fame?  Mayo played in 834 games --- and he could have played in a lot more, but he was worried about having enough money to pay his son's college tuition  --- so he got into management with the Toledo MudHens.  Put this in perspective:   Whitey

Ford played in only 498 games (not counting the 5 or 6 hundred World Series games he appeared in).  Why should Ford be in the Hall --- and not Eddie Mayo ?????   And, of course, why not Puddin' Head ???

 

Mayo in Hall, Maz  Removed  in  Dramatic  Turnaround  

     Veterans Committee Corrects Grave Error

      Bill James, Ted Williams Applaud Action

_____________________________________________________________________________________

 

One more sports item.  I spent the entire morning researching why Maz should NOT be in the HofF.  Or, why, if he does, Eddie Mayo belongs, too.   Here's the evidence.  I've included a couple of other fairly good second sackers just so you can compare and contrast.  First, the fielding evidence:

 

                     Total       Total

                 Career    Career             Errors/Games                      Adjusted Err/G ames

                 Errors    Games                    Ratio                                      Ratio**

 

Mayo            86         834        1 err every  9.69 games                        11.69

Maz            204       2163        1 err every 10.60games                        10.60

Gordon       264       1566        1 err every   5.93games                          7.93

Doerr          214       1865        1 err every   8.71games                        10.71

Gehr'ger      310       2323        1 err every   7.49games                       10.49

 

** For each decade separating the midpoint of each player's most productive years, an adjustment factor = 1.00 is added to that player's ratio to account for the increasing size of baseball gloves;   and for the fact that as each decade passed, ground crews became more adept at removing rocks, stones, gopher holes, and hotel keys from infield dirt --- not to mention the fact that infield grass was measurably smoother as time passed.  The base decade is the 1960s, thus Mazeroski gets nothing added to his ratio since he played on qualitatively better infields with a much larger glove.  (This is fair.  Whitaker would lose 2-3 points.)

 

As you can see, Eddie Mayo clearly was a better infielder than Mazeroski --- and, in fact, was better than a couple of genuine Hall of Famers, Gehringer and  Doerr, as well as Joe Gordon, who Mayo himself considered to be a quality infielder.

 

Now for the offensive evidence:

 

1.  It is true that Mazeroski hit a few home runs . . .  138 . . . .and one World Series homerun that was most significant because it kept the Yankees from putting another notch on the bedpost.  (It was, in fact, less significant, from a historical perspective, than Bucky Dent's home run that kept the Red Sox from having a shot at making history by playing in the World Series in 1978.)

 

Let's keep things in perspective here.  Puddin' Head Jones had 199 home runs in his career.  He did NOT, however, hit a home run in the '50 Series against -- oh them again -- the Yankees.  Do you think if Willie had hit one against the Yanks, he would have been voted into the Hall of Fame?  Probably not, I'd say --- although I would have voted for him, of course.

 

Here's some more data:

 

Career Pinch Hitting Record (a far better measure of clutch hitting over the course of a career than "number of home runs in the ninth inning of the final game of a World Series”):

 

    Mazeroski         13 for 60 (avg = .217)

    Mayo                12 for 44 (avg = .273)

 

 

Career Stolen Bases . . . . . I know you'll scratch your head on this one:

 

    Mazeroski         27   (=  1 every 80 games or about 2 a season)

    Mayo                29   (=  1 every 28 games or about 5 a season)  (and I'm sure had they

ept statistics on number of missed third strikes beat out that Mayo would have beat Mazeroski on this, too)

 

KO / BB Ratio:

 

    Mazeroski     706 KO / 447 BB   (ratio = 1.58) = for every walk, Maz KO'd 1.58 times

    Mayo            175 KO / 258 BB   (ratio = 0.68) = for every walk, Mayo KO'd 0.68 times

 

 

I rest my case on one last point.  Maz' major league career was longer, but as you and I have discussed before, should longevity play a role in deciding who belongs in the H of Fame?  Mayo played in 834 games --- and he could have played in a lot more, but he was worried about having enough money to pay his son's college tuition  --- so he got into management with the Toledo MudHens.  Put this in perspective:   Whitey

Ford played in only 498 games (not counting the 5 or 6 hundred World Series games he appeared in).  Why should Ford be in the Hall --- and not Eddie Mayo ?????   And, of course, why not Puddin' Head ???

 

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