ECE 2100 Circuit Analysis

Fall 2021
version 11 October 2021

Instructor

Dr. Damon A. Miller, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Western Michigan University, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Floyd Hall, Room A-240, 269.276.3158, 269.276.3151 (fax), damon.miller@wmich.edu, www.homepages.wmich.edu/~miller/, https://wmich.webex.com/meet/damon.miller.

Course Format Summary
This is only a summary; details are provided within this document.

Due dates will be strictly enforced this semester. Late assignments will not be accepted without prior approval (as possible) and official documentation.

 

NO FOOD OR DRINK IN LECTURE OR LAB.

 

ONLY STUDENTS WITH GREEN BADGE STATUS ARE PERMITTED IN LECTURE OR LAB. YOU MUST BE ABLE TO SHOW YOUR BADGE STATUS, particularly at the start of lab.
See
https://wmich.edu/covid-19

 

Lecture.

·        You should attend all in-person lectures (note the possibility of unannounced quizzes).
If you miss class, previously-recorded lectures are available on ELearning:
https://ELearning.wmich.edu/shared/online/landing.html
The previously-recorded lectures may NOT provide all information provided in class.

·        Homework is via the online McGraw-Hill connect® system.

·        Exams will be conducted during the scheduled lecture and final exam times.

·        Dr. Miller is available in his office during office hours as posted here.

Laboratories

·        In-person lab attendance is MANDATORY during the assigned meeting time. See the course schedule. Lab reports will not be accepted from students that do not attend the associated lab session.

·        Lab reports and supporting work is submitted via ELearning.

Note
This syllabus provides a detailed course schedule from which supplemental materials (e.g. lab handouts and previous exams) can be downloaded. ELearning is ONLY used to provide previously recorded lectures and for lab report submissions to laboratory instructors.

 

Office Hours
Dr. Miller is available for in-person office hours as posted in his schedule. Appointments at other times are requested by email to damon.miller@wmich.edu.


 

Laboratory Sections
Laboratory sessions are held in the Electrical Circuit[s] Laboratory, Room B-215, Floyd Hall.

LAB MEETING TIME

INSTRUCTOR

EMAIL

OFFICE HOURS

(start 2nd week of semester)

M 6:30PM-9:10PM

M. Panahi

masoud.panahi@wmich.edu

W 11AM-1PM (B-215)

T 8:30AM-11:10AM

M. El Yabroudi

m.elyabroudi@wmich.edu

R 2:10PM-4:10PM (B-222c)

T 6:30PM-9:10PM

M. Panahi

masoud.panahi@wmich.edu

W 11AM-1PM (B-215)

T 2:30PM-5:10PM

H. Emani

h.emani@wmich.edu

TBD

W 6:30PM-9:10PM

M. Panahi

masoud.panahi@wmich.edu

W 11AM-1PM (B-215)

R 8:30AM-11:10AM

H. Emani

h.emani@wmich.edu

TBD

R 6:30PM-9:10PM

M. El Yabroudi

m.elyabroudi@wmich.edu

R 2:10PM-4:10PM (B-222c)

 

Tutors
Please visit
https://wmich.edu/step/successcenter for tutoring services.

 

Catalog Description

ECE 2100 Circuit Analysis (3-3), 4 hrs. Analysis of linear electric circuits using methods based on Kirchhoff's laws and network theorems. RL, RC, and RLC transients. Sinusoidal steady state analysis. Prerequisites: PHYS 2070 (or taken concurrently) and MATH 1230 or 1710; with a grade of “C” or better in all prerequisites.

 

Acknowledgements

ECE faculty, including S. Durbin, J. Gesink, J. Kelemen, and F. Severance, contributed to course materials. Dr. Miller thanks current and past laboratory instructors that have provided improvements to this course.

He also thanks Instructional Designer M. Strock and the Educational Technology Department for contributions to course materials, including this syllabus.

 

Copyright Information

Materials prepared by Dr. Miller are © 2021 Damon A. Miller. Other copyrights apply to materials such as text and images from books, datasheets, etc. Consult source documents for copyright information. Lecture videos are for use in ECE 2100 only and must not be distributed in any way.

 

Course Overview

This course explores the analysis of linear circuits for constant (DC) and time-varying (AC) excitation using methods based on Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law (KVL), Kirchhoff’s Current Law (KCL), and network theorems. Transient responses of first and second-order circuits are found by solving differential equations. Particular emphasis is placed on using complex numbers (phasors) to analyze circuits in the sinusoidal steady state owing to the importance of sinusoids in electric power distribution and electronic circuit design. Students move from analysis to the design of practical circuits including voltmeters, ammeters, and filters. Operational amplifier applications are explored in lecture and lab. The course includes hands-on learning via a rigorous laboratory experience and extensive use of circuit simulation software.

 

Course Objectives

This course explores

1.      Electric charge, current, voltage, energy, and power;

2.      Analysis of linear DC circuits using Ohm's law, Kirchhoff's Voltage Law (KVL, mesh analysis), and Kirchhoff's Current Law (KCL, nodal analysis);

3.      Network analysis techniques including superposition, source transformations, and Thevenin and Norton's theorems;

4.      Design of DC voltmeters and ammeters using d'Arsonval movement meters;

5.      Analysis and design of electronic circuits, including amplifiers and filters, that utilize operational amplifiers;

6.      Terminal characteristics of capacitors and inductors;

7.      Analysis of steady state linear AC circuits containing dependent and independent sources, resistors, capacitors, and inductors;

8.      DC and AC power calculations including power factor correction;

9.      Determining the step response of first and second order linear circuits;

10.   Representing the step response as a sum of a transient and steady state response and a natural and forced response;

11.   Analysis, simulation, and experimental validation of DC circuits;

12.   Analysis and simulation of AC circuits;

13.   Use of test instrumentation such as voltmeters, ammeters, ohmmeters, signal generators, and oscilloscopes;

14.   Thorough and accurate documentation of laboratory work using a laboratory notebook;

15.   Thorough and accurate documentation of laboratory results using a laboratory report; and

16.   Functioning as an effective engineering team member.

Textbook and Materials

 

Lecture
Required:

You need the text and access to the online McGraw-Hill Education connect® system.

1.      Text: C. K. Alexander and M. N. O. Sadiku, Fundamentals of Electric Circuits,
McGraw-Hill Education, 7th edition.

2.      McGraw-Hill connect® system access
You have several options for obtaining these materials:

a.      All digital option: Alexander and Sadiku eBook and connect® access card (Alexander), available from bookstore. ISBN-13:  9781264272686

b.      All digital option: Alexander and Sadiku eBook and connect® access (Alexander) card. Purchase access card with eBook when you register for connect® access via the provided registration link (below). Price will be higher if you purchase from the ‘general’ McGraw-Hill website, so use the registration link.

c.      Loose leaf Alexander and Sadiku text with connect® access (Alexander) card, available in bookstore. ISBN-13:  9781264272648

 

On-Line Homework Student Registration Information:

Course:  ECE 2100 Circuit Analysis

Instructor:  Damon Miller

Section:  Fall 2021

Online Registration Instructions:

https://connect.mheducation.com/class/d-miller-fall-2021-3

Note that your homework assignments are stored on a non-WMU server.  Do not provide confidential information such as your WIN number.  If you wish to keep your homework scores anonymous on that server, as far as the instructor is concerned, you do not have to use your wmich.edu email address as your ID; in that case, you may use an alternative ID, but you must notify the course instructor.

Laboratory
Required:

3.      J. Kelemen, D. A. Miller, F. L. Severance, S. Durbin, et al., ECE 2100 Laboratory Manual.  This manual is accessible online as individual links within the course schedule at the end of this document. It is your responsibility to check the manual for updates as the semester progresses.

4.      Digital multimeter (or equivalent):  RSR Digital Multimeter

5.      Safety glasses meeting ANSI Z87.1, e.g. Safety Glasses
Glasses must have side protection.
Students will not be admitted to the lab without safety glasses
.

6.      Linear Technology, LTspice®, available at no cost at http://www.linear.com/designtools/software/.  This software will be used to simulate circuits.  You are responsible for ensuring access to a working copy.

 

SPICE EXAMPLES

 

a.      VCCS example (problem 4.43 from Nilsson and Reidel, Electric Circuits, 8th ed.)

b.      CCCS and CCVS example (problem 4.51 from Nilsson and Reidel Electric Circuits, 8th ed.)

c.      VCVS example (simple operational amplifier model)

d.      Chua’s “Simple” Chaotic Circuit (need the National Semiconductor LM741 model available as part of laboratory six in the course schedule below.

 

7.      You must maintain a laboratory notebook (permanently bound, not loose leaf, 8.5 inches x 11 inches, 60 pages minimum, quadrille ruled, each page has a square grid, no carbon paper pages) to record your laboratory work. Use a pen to record your work (not a pencil); simply cross-out, but do not obliterate, mistakes. This National Engineering and Science Notebook is a good choice.

8.      Ruler

9.      Calculator

10.   Bring your text to lab.

 

References (also see course schedule):

  1. J. W. Nilsson and S. A. Riedel, Electric Circuits, 10th ed., Pearson, Boston, 2015.
  2. M. M. Radmanesh, Electronic Waves & Transmission Line Circuit Design: Your Illustrated Guide to Wave Engineering, AuthorHouse, 2011.
  3. W. H. Middendorf and R. H. Engelmann, Design of Devices and Systems, Marcel Dekker, 3rd ed., 1998.
  4. J. A. Cadzow and H. F. Van Landingham, Signals, Systems, and Transforms, Prentice-Hall, Inc., New Jersey, 1985.
  5. B. Lojek, History of Semiconductor Engineering, Springer-Verlag, 2007.
  6. A. S. Sedra and K. C. Smith, Microelectronic Circuits, 4th ed., Oxford University Press, 1998.
  7. Weisstein, Eric W. "Fourier Series--Square Wave." From MathWorld--A Wolfram Web Resource. http://mathworld.wolfram.com/FourierSeriesSquareWave.html
  8. J. L. Kirtley Jr., AC Power Flow in Linear Networks, copyright date 2007, available here.
  9. Kennedy, M.P., "Three Steps to Chaos. I. Evolution," IEEE Transactions on Circuits & Systems I-Fundamental Theory & Applications, vol.40, no.10, pp.640-656, 1993.
  10. Kennedy, M.P., "Three Steps to Chaos. II. A Chua's Circuit Primer," IEEE Transactions on Circuits & Systems I-Fundamental Theory & Applications, vol.40, no.10, pp.657-674, 1993.
  11. S. H. Strogatz, Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos: With Applications to Physics, Biology, Chemistry, and Engineering, Westview Press, 2nd ed., 2015.
  12. E. Scheinerman, Invitation to Dynamical Systems, Prentice Hall, 1996.

 

Recommended:

  1. The Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology has an excellent interactive “Circuits Learned by Example Online” website that includes mini-lectures on how to work many types of circuit analysis problems:  http://www.rose-hulman.edu/CLEO/
  2. http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/
  3. http://falstad.com/circuit/

 

Course Policies

Academic Honesty

General:

Students are responsible for making themselves aware of and understanding the University policies and procedures that pertain to Academic Honesty. These policies include cheating, fabrication, falsification and forgery, multiple submission, plagiarism, complicity and computer misuse. The academic policies addressing Student Rights and Responsibilities can be found in the Undergraduate Catalog at http://catalog.wmich.edu/index.php?catoid=35 and the Graduate Catalog at http://catalog.wmich.edu/index.php?catoid=39. If there is reason to believe you have been involved in academic dishonesty, you will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. You will be given the opportunity to review the charge(s) and if you believe you are not responsible, you will have the opportunity for a hearing. You should consult with your instructor if you are uncertain about an issue of academic honesty prior to the submission of an assignment or test.

 

Students and instructors are responsible for making themselves aware of and abiding by the “Western Michigan University Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment and Violence, Intimate Partner Violence, and Stalking Policy and Procedures” related to prohibited sexual misconduct under Title IX, the Clery Act and the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and Campus Safe. Under this policy, responsible employees (including instructors) are required to report claims of sexual misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator or designee (located in the Office of Institutional Equity). Responsible employees are not confidential resources. For a complete list of resources and more information about the policy see http://www.wmich.edu/sexualmisconduct.

 

In addition, students are encouraged to access the Code of Conduct, as well as resources and general academic policies on such issues as diversity, religious observance, and student disabilities:

·        Office of Student Conduct http://www.wmich.edu/conduct

·        Division of Student Affairs http://www.wmich.edu/students/diversity

·        Registrar’s Office http://www.wmich.edu/registrar/calendars/interfaith

·        Disability Services for Students http://www.wmich.edu/disabilityservices.

 

— section provided by the WMU Faculty Senate with minor link reformatting

 

Plagiarism: For an in-depth exploration of plagiarism, see http://libguides.wmich.edu/plagiarism

 

COVID-19 Statement

 

Safety requirements are in place to minimize exposure to the Western Michigan University community. These guidelines apply to all in-person and hybrid classes held inside a WMU building to ensure the safety of all students, faculty, and staff during the pandemic. Noncompliance is a violation of the class requirements and the Student Code. https://wmich.edu/conduct/code

Facial coverings (masks), over both the nose and mouth, are required for all students while in- class, no matter the size of the space. Following this recommendation can minimize the transmission of the virus, which is spread between people interacting in close proximity through speaking, coughing, or sneezing. During specified classes in which facial coverings (masks) would prevent required class elements, students may remove facial coverings (masks) with instructor permission, in accordance with the exceptions in the Facial Covering (mask) Policy ("such as playing an instrument, acting, singing, etc."). https://wmich.edu/policies/facial-covering-mask

Facial coverings (masks) must remain in place throughout the class. Any student who removes the mandatory facial covering (mask) during class will be required to leave the classroom immediately.

Students who are unable to wear a facial covering (mask) for medical/disability reasons must contact Disability Services for Students before they attend class. https://wmich.edu/disabilityservices

— section provided by the WMU Faculty Senate, highlight added

NO FOOD OR DRINK IN LECTURE OR LAB.

 

ONLY STUDENTS WITH A GREEN BADGE STATUS ARE PERMITTED IN LECTURE OR LAB. YOU MUST BE ABLE TO DEMONSTRATE YOUR BADGE STATUS, particularly at the start of lab.

Accommodations

If you have a documented disability and verification from the Disability Services for Students (DSS), and wish to discuss academic accommodations, please contact your instructor as soon as possible. It is the student’s responsibility to provide documentation of disability to DSS and meet with a DSS counselor to request special accommodation before classes start.

 

Grading Basis

  1. Examinations (2 in-semester exams plus final): 60%
    Final counts as two in-semester exams.
    Due to the class size requests for examination rescheduling cannot be approved though religious observances will be accommodated with advanced notice.
  2. Homework: 10%
    There are unlimited submission attempts for the online homework assignments;
    the highest grade is used
    .
  3. Laboratory:  30%
    Students earning less than 70% in the lab will be assigned an ‘E’.

OUTSTANDING WORK might earn extra credit. The first student to report an error in any material prepared by the instructor(s) will earn extra credit. The course grading scale is:

 

Scale: 0-59 E | 60-64 D | 65-69 DC | 70-74 C | 75-79 CB | 80-84 B | 85-89 BA | 90-100 A |
Numeric scores are rounded to the nearest integer.

A grade of ‘X’ will be assigned to any student that earns an ‘E’ and does not complete all examinations including the final.

Midterm grades are not assigned.

Viewing Grades
Homework grades are available via the McGraw-Hill connect® website. It is your responsibility to monitor your online scores to insure you received proper credit.

Grade Appeals
If you have a question regarding graded course materials (e.g. exam problems, homework problems, laboratory reports, etc.), contact Dr. Miller within TWO business days of receiving the grade for the assignment in question.

Late Assignments will not be accepted without a documented excuse. If an emergency prevents you from submitting an assignment on-time, contact your instructor PRIOR to the assignment due date or as soon as you can, via email.  Failure to adhere to this policy will result in zero credit for the assignment.

EXAMINATIONS will be closed-notes closed-book. All electronic devices, including watches, must be stowed away. You must have a WMU issued ID with you at the exam. No hats or hoods may be worn during exams without prior approval. If you observe an apparent incident of academic misconduct, please confidentially alert the course instructor.

 

Students that exit the exam area during the examination period may not resume taking the exam upon their return. Please address any personal issues prior to the exam session.

 

Only under extremely unusual circumstances will make-up examinations be considered.  If an emergency prevents you from attending a scheduled examination or quiz, contact Dr. Miller via email PRIOR to the test or as soon as you can. Failure to adhere to this policy will result in zero credit for the exercise.

 

LABORATORY

Lab attendance is mandatory.

 

Students must successfully complete the laboratory safety quiz prior to performing any ECE 2100 experiments. Any indication of failure to follow safe laboratory procedures will result in removal from the lab and course failure.

 

Only under extremely unusual circumstances will make-up laboratories be considered.  Religious observances will be accommodated with advanced notice. If an emergency prevents you from attending a laboratory or arriving on-time, contact your lab instructor via email PRIOR to the lab or as soon as you can. Failure to adhere to this policy will result in zero credit for the lab. Joining or arriving late to lab (i.e. after the posted start time) without a valid excuse may result in zero credit for that lab.  There is no obligation to provide makeup lab sessions for unexcused tardy or absent students. Students must obtain email approval from Dr. Miller prior to making up a lab.

 

Grading Basis

Your laboratory grade will be determined using the following evaluation criteria:

1.      Pre-lab quizzes (20%). Quizzes are closed book; however, you may use your laboratory notebook on quizzes. Potential sources of quiz questions include previous labs and the current pre-lab assignment and may require calculations.

2.      Lab reports (80%).

a.      Unless otherwise noted, each lab team submits one report.
ECE 2100 LABS ARE COMPLETED INDIVIDUALLY OR IN TEAMS OF TWO.
No three-person teams.

b.      USE A WHITE BACKGROUND FOR ALL LTspice® schematics and waveform plots. Reports must not be handwritten, though you must include copies of your hand-written lab notebook as an appendix.

c.      It is essential that whenever possible hand analysis, simulation, and experimental results be presented side-by-side (using tables or graphs) and errors between these results be quantitatively described.  Explain discrepancies.

d.      Whenever possible, present your results in graphical form.  One approach is to plot hand analysis and experimental results on top of graphs obtained via simulation. Plot the independent variable along the abscissa and dependent variable(s) along the ordinate. Do not ‘connect-the-dots,’ that is, do not connect experimental points with “best-guess” curves unless there is a valid reason for doing so.

e.      Tables are another effective method of organizing and presenting results.

 

Your lab report describes ALL OF YOUR LAB WORK and is a STAND-ALONE DOCUMENT, including any LTspice® schematics/results (those can be pasted from LTspice(R) into a document editor by using ‘Tools->Copy bitmap to Clipboard’). The lab report is organized as follows. Use separate section headings for each item.

 

1.      Title page

Team Member #1 Name
Team Member #1 Major

 

Team Member #2 Name
Team Member #2 Major

ECE 2100 Laboratory Report

 

Title of Experiment

Date Laboratory was Performed

 

Name of Laboratory Instructor
Day/Time of your lab section

 

2.      Summary (on separate page):  Brief but complete statement of what you did.

 

Example:

The complex power of a series-connected ??? Ω resistor (R) and ??? H inductor (L) operating at 60 Hz was investigated. The complex power was determined to be 100 + 100j VA by hand analysis and simulation. Addition of a ??? uF capacitor connected in parallel to the RL load resulted in a unity power factor in both hand analysis and simulation work.

 

3.      Prelab:  Include the prelab results here after correcting any errors. Whenever possible present results in tabular form. If there is not a prelab assignment include simply indicate N/A in this section.

4.      Results:

a.      Present your results keyed to each step of the laboratory procedure.
Include schematics, sketches, plots, etc.

b.      Describe what was done and document your results.

5.      Analysis:  Provide response(s) to any end-of-lab questions. If none simply indicate N/A in this section.

6.      Contributions:  List the contributions of each team member to completion of the experiment and report.

7.      Conclusions: Describe lessons learned.

8.      Lab Notebook: Attach the related lab notebook pages as an appendix FOR EACH TEAM MEMBER. Team members with poor notebook entries will be penalized.

 

Style

Observe proper sentence structure, spelling, and punctuation. Use third person, passive voice. Avoid repetition, the obvious, abstractions, and wordiness.

 

Submission

Unless otherwise noted, each lab team submits ONE PDF report and ONE ZIP file containing supporting files; only one team member submits these two items.

1.      Submit your REPORT as a single PDF file to your lab instructor’s ELearning Dropbox by the indicated due date for that lab. Name the file as follows:

“LastNameFirstName_Report_Lab#_SessionDayAndTime”; for example,
DoeJane_Report_Lab8_R830.pdf

is Jane Doe’s report submission for her Thursday 8:30 lab team. The lab report is a stand-alone document and includes all of your work, including LTspice® schematics and simulation results.

2.      Submit all SUPPORTING FILES (e.g. ALL LTspice® files) used in your lab work to your lab instructor’s ELearning Dropbox by the indicated due date for that lab as a single ZIP file. Name the file as follows:

 

“LastNameFirstName_SPICE_Lab#_SessionDayAndTime”; for example, “DoeJane_SPICE_Lab8_R830.zip”

is Jane Doe’s supporting files submission for her Thursday 8:30 lab group.

 

Submissions not following these instructions will not be accepted.

 

3.      Lab notebook (part of lab reports grade) You must also maintain a laboratory notebook. Lab notebooks provide a convenient and professional method of organizing and storing your lab work and records.  Your laboratory notebook will be evaluated for neatness, organization, technical accuracy, and completeness as part of your lab report submission.  Specific guidelines for the notebook will be provided in the laboratory.

 

Each laboratory must be initialed by the lab instructor. Signatures will be made in only two cases:

a.      The laboratory is complete including the results section (LAB COMPLETE signature);

b.      The lab session is over (IN PROGRESS signature). For this case a second LAB COMPLETE signature is required by the end of the next lab session.

Lab reports without sign-off notebook pages will not be accepted.

 

HOMEWORK

Homework assignments are via the online McGraw-Hill connect® system. Due dates are posted in the course schedule. It is your responsibility to monitor your online homework scores to ensure that you have received proper credit.

 

If you believe that there is an error in an online problem solution, submit that problem to Dr. Miller before the assignment due date via email. Include complete documentation (e.g. circuit diagrams) and a printout of the online solution with error(s) identified.  Clearly show how you arrived at your solution. If there is an online homework system problem that precludes you from an on-time assignment submission, contact the instructor prior to when the assignment is due.

 

Tentative Course Schedule
The schedule will be frequently updated as the semester progresses.

 

#

date

topic

Topic numbers are keyed to online supplemental lectures

assignments

WEEK 1

NO LAB MEETING

(COMPLETE THE LAB SAFETY MODULE)
Read

ECE 2100 Laboratory:  Safety and Rules

ECE 2100 Laboratory:  Notebook Requirements

View lecture #6 on electrical laboratory safety on ELearning.
Complete and submit the
SAFETY QUIZ
DUE BY 9/10 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox.

 1 

9/1

Course Overview

1.      Course welcome, overview, and syllabus review

2.      How to succeed in this course

Purchase McGraw-Hill access

Install LTspice®

Acquire safety glasses and multimeter

 

read syllabus

read CH 1: Basic Concepts

 

HW #1: Connect Orientation
DUE 9/13

 2 

9/3

3.      What engineers do

4.      “Greatest Engineering Achievements of the 20th Century”

5.      Overview of electrical engineering
IEEE Societies

6.      Electrical laboratory safety

7.      What is a circuit?

HW #2: (CH 1 and 2)

DUE 9/20

 

Read CH 2:  Basic Laws


WEEK 2

NO LAB MEETING
(COMPLETE LAB 1 AT HOME)
You can seek help during any lab instructor lab meeting times or office hours.
LAB 1:
Passive Sign Convention and LTspice(R) Introduction (SIMULATION ONLY)
REPORT DUE BY 9/17 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox
Each student submits a report (no lab teams)

 

9/6

LABOR DAY: NO CLASS

 

 3 

9/8

Fundamental Concepts

What is a circuit?

8.      Charge and Current (1.3)

9.      Voltage (1.4)

 

 4 

9/10

Voltage (1.4)

10.   Ohm’s Law (2.2), power, conservation of energy (1.5), and the passive sign convention

LAB SAFETY QUIZ DUE

WEEK 3

LAB 2:  Basic Circuit Measurements and Ohm’s Law
REPORT DUE BY 9/24 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox

 5 

9/13

11.   Circuit Elements (1.6)

12.   Resistance and Conductance

HW #1 DUE

 

HW #3: (CH 2)

DUE 9/27

 6 

9/15

13.   Problem Solving (1.8)

14.   Engineering analysis vs. design

15.   network topology (2.3)

16.   Kirchhoff’s Laws (2.4)(KCL)

17.   Kirchhoff’s Laws (2.4)(KVL)

 

 7 

9/17

Kirchhoff’s Laws (2.4)(KVL)

18.   Series resistors/voltage divider (2.5)

19.   Wheatstone Bridge (4.10.2)

20.   Parallel resistors/current divider (2.6)

LAB 1 REPORT DUE

 

Read CH 3:  Methods of Analysis

WEEK 4

LAB 3:  Series and Parallel Circuits

REPORT DUE BY 10/1 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox

 8 

9/20

21.   Equivalent resistance (2.6)

22.   Wye-Delta Transformations (2.7)

23.   Design of DC Meters (2.8.2)

HW #2 DUE

 

9/22

NO LECTURE: Engineering Expo 2021
(LABS STILL MEET)

 

 9 

9/24

Design of DC Meters (2.8.2)

24.   Meter sensitivity

Nodal and Mesh Analysis

25.   Nodal Analysis (3.2)(also 3.3)

LAB 2 REPORT DUE
HW #4: (CH 3)

DUE 10/4

WEEK 5

LAB 4: Basic DC Meter Design

REPORT DUE BY 10/8 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox.

10 

9/27

Nodal Analysis (3.2)(also 3.3)

26.   Mesh Analysis (3.4)(also 3.5)

HW #3 DUE

Read CH 4:  Circuit Theorems

 

9/29

Mesh Analysis (3.4)(also 3.5)

27.   Nodal and Mesh Analyses by Inspection (3.6)

28.   Comparing nodal and mesh analysis (3.7)

 

11 

10/1

QUIZ 1

Circuit Theorems (CH 4)

29.   Source Transformation (4.4)

30.   Linear systems (4.2)

HW #5: (CH 4)

DUE 10/13
LAB 3 REPORT DUE

WEEK 6

LAB 5:  Nodal and Mesh Analysis: Comparison of Analysis, Simulated, and Experimental Results

REPORT DUE BY 10/15 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox.

12 

10/4

31.   Superposition (4.3)

32.   Thevenin equivalent circuits (4.5)

HW #4 DUE

13 

10/6

Thevenin equivalent circuits (4.5)

33.   Negative resistance

34.   Norton equivalent circuits (4.6)

Read CH 5:  Operational Amplifiers

14 

10/8

QUIZ 2

35.   Maximum Power Transfer (4.8)

Operational Amplifiers (CH 5)

36.   Ideal Op Amp (5.3)

37.   Internal circuitry of LM741 op-amp
LM741 Operational Amplifier Datasheet
Chip Hall of Fame: Fairchild Semiconductor μA741 Op-Amp

LAB 4 REPORT DUE

 

HW #6: (CH 5)
DUE 10/29

WEEK 7

LAB 6:  Superposition and Thevenin’s Theorem

REPORT DUE BY 10/25 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox

15 

10/11

38.   Inverting and non-inverting configurations (5.4, 5.5)

39.   Non-inverting amplifier as negative feedback system

40.   Operational amplifier applications: buffer amplifier

 

16 

10/13

EXAM 1 REVIEW
Covers CHs 1-4
NOTE:  Sample exams are for practice only; your exam might not look anything like these!

Exam #1 Spring 2015

Exam #1 Summer I 2015

Exam #1 Fall 2015

Exam #1 Spring 2016

Exam #1 Fall 2016

Exam #1 Spring 2017

Exam #1 Summer I 2017

Exam #1 Fall 2017

Exam #1 Spring 2018

Exam #1 Fall 2018

Exam #1 Spring 2019

Exam #1 Summer I 2019

Exam #1 Fall 2019
Exam #1 Spring 2020

HW #5 DUE

17 

10/15

41.   Operational amplifier applications: voltmeter w/ meter movement

42.   Operational amplifier applications: I-V converter

43.   Operational amplifier applications: Summing Amplifier (5.6)

44.   Operational amplifier applications: Difference Amplifier (5.7), Common Mode Rejection Ratio (CMRR)

Example application (V-I converter using diff amp): Essenburg, Lucas M., "Intracellular Electrometer" (2019). Master's Theses:
https://scholarworks.wmich.edu/masters_theses/5099
Dr. John Jellies Laboratory

45.   Operational amplifier applications: Instrumentation amplifier (Example 5.8)

Linear Technology LT1167 Precision Instrumentation Amplifier datasheet

 

NovaSensor NPC-1220 Series Medium Pressure Sensors

 

J. Stahl, Dual Channel Low Noise Amplifier for Experiments In Neurophysiology, Master of Science in Electrical Engineering Thesis, 2009.

LAB REPORT 5 DUE

 

WEEK 8

NO LAB MEETING

18 

10/18

EXAM 1
(no calculators, bring WMU ID)

Read CH 6:  Capacitors and Inductors

 

10/20

NO CLASS: Fall Break

 

 

10/22

NO CLASS: Fall Break

 

WEEK 9

LAB 7:  Basic Waveforms and Oscilloscope Operation

REPORT DUE BY 11/5 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox

19 

10/25

Review graded Exam #1

LAB REPORT 6 DUE

20 

10/27

Capacitors and Inductors (CH 6)

46.   Sinusoids (9.2)

47.   Capacitance (6.2, 6.3): Fundamentals/Charging/Lemon Battery Application/Terminal Characteristics/Power/Energy

 

Read 13.2 Mutual Inductance, 13.5 Ideal Transformers, and 13.9.3 Power Distribution

21 

10/29

Capacitance (6.2, 6.3): Switched RC Circuit/Sinusoidal Excitation/Equivalent Capacitance

HW #6 DUE

 

HW #7 (CH 6)
DUE 11/8

WEEK 10

LAB 8:  Operational Amplifier Circuits

NationalSemiconductorModels.lib (contains model of LM741 from National Semiconductor)

Put this file in the same directory as your LTspice schematic and put the SPICE directive
“.include NationalSemiconductorModels.lib” in your schematic.
REPORT DUE BY 11/12 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox

22 

11/1

LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW

 

48.   Electronic integrators/differentiators (6.6.1, 6.6.2)

Analog Computer (6.6.3, Example 6.15)

49.   Supercapacitors

https://www.technologyreview.com/2013/11/12/175448/graphene-supercapacitors-ready-for-electric-vehicle-energy-storage-say-korean-engineers/
D. Salerno, “Low Profile Supercapacitor Power Backup with Input Current Limiting,” LT Journal of Analog Innovation, Nov. 2015:

http://cds.linear.com/docs/en/lt-journal/LTJournal-V25N3-03-df-LTC3128-DaveSalerno.pdf

50.   Inductance (6.4, 6.5): Fundamentals/Terminal Characteristics/Power/Energy/Switched Parallel RL Circuit/Equivalent Inductance/Sinusoidal Excitation/Example Inductors

Triad Dual-Function Chokes
Coilcraft BCL/BCR Series Conical Inductors

 

VIEW THESE LECTURES ON ELEARNING

51.   Ideal transformers (13.5)/applications (13.9.3 Power Distribution, Parkview Campus transformer failure)
Transformers, The Unsung Technology

United States Electricity Industry Primer
(see page 22 for figure used in class)

 

Mill Creek Generating Station
(1465MW Generation Capacity,
Dr. Miller worked there as an intern)
Technical details available
here.

 

Parkview Campus Transformer Failure
Details courtesy Dan Brimmer/Lucas Essenburg

 

U.S. electricity generation by energy source
(updated to 2019)

 

52.   Mutual Inductance (13.2)

Read CH 9:  Sinusoids and Phasors

Read Appendix B:  Complex Numbers

23 

11/3

Sinusoids and Phasors (CH 9)

53.   Importance of sinusoids in engineering
Weisstein, Eric W. "Fourier Series--Square Wave." From MathWorld--A Wolfram Web Resource. http://mathworld.wolfram.com/FourierSeriesSquareWave.html

54.   Introduction to phasors (9.3)

55.   Passive circuit elements in the phasor domain (9.4)

HW #8: (CH 9)
DUE 11/15

24 

11/5

56.   Impedance and Admittance (9.5)

57.   Analysis of circuits in the sinusoidal steady state using phasors (9.6)

LAB REPORT 7 DUE

WEEK 11

LAB 9: Steady-State AC Behavior of Passive Circuit Elements
REPORT DUE 11/19 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox.

25 

11/8

58.   Equivalent impedance (9.7)

59.   Resonance in parallel RLC circuit

60.   Using resonant LC circuit to tune radio

HW #7 DUE

26 

11/10

61.   RC low and high-pass filters/Application to speaker crossover network

Read CH 10:  Sinusoidal Steady-State Analysis
Read 13.9.2 Transformer as a Matching Device

27 

11/12

Circuit Analysis in the Phasor Domain

62.   Circuit analysis in the phasor domain (10)

LAB REPORT 8 DUE

 

HW #9: (CH 10, 11)
DUE 11/22

WEEK 12

LAB 10: Frequency and Intuitive Step Response of RC Filters

REPORT DUE 11/29 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox.

28 

11/15

Circuit analysis in the phasor domain (10)

HW #8 DUE
Read CH 11: AC Power Analysis

29 

11/17

63.   Capacitance Multiplier (10.9.1)

AC Power Analysis

64.   Root Mean Square Value (11.4)

65.   Instantaneous and Average Power (11.2)

66.   Complex Power (11.6)

 

30 

11/19

67.   Power Factor Correction (11.8)

68.   Q in the time domain: theory and simulation

LAB REPORT 9 DUE

WEEK 13

LAB 11: AC Power Factor and Power Factor Correction

REPORT DUE 12/3 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox.

31 

11/22

69.   Maximum Average Power Transfer (11.3)

70.   Impedance matching w/ transformer (13.9.2)

71.   Resonance w/ Radio Tuning

HW #9 DUE

 

Read CH 7:  First-Order Circuits

Read CH 8:  Second-Order Circuits

32 

11/24

EXAM 2
(no calculators, bring WMU ID)

Covers all material except CH 7 and 8

NOTE:  Sample exams are for practice only; your exam might not look anything like these!

Exam #2 Spring 2015

Exam #2 Summer I 2015

Exam #2 Fall 2015

Exam #2 Spring 2016

Exam #2 Fall 2016

Exam #2 Spring 2017

Exam #2 Summer I 2017

Exam #2 Fall 2017

Exam #2 Spring 2018

Exam #2 Fall 2018

Exam #2 Spring 2019

Exam #2 Summer I 2019

Exam #2 Fall 2019

 

 

11/26

NO CLASS: Thanksgiving



WEEK 14

LAB 12: Step Response of First and Second-Order Circuits

LAB REPORT DUE 12/10 5PM to lab instructor ELearning Dropbox.

33 

11/29

First-Order Circuits (CH 7)

72.   Steady-state vs. transient analysis

73.   Natural response (RC)(7.2)

74.   Natural response (RL) (7.3)

LAB REPORT 10 DUE

 

HW #10 (CH 7,8)

DUE 12/10

34 

12/1

75.   Singularity Functions (7.4)

76.   Step response (RC)(7.5)

77.   Step response (RL)(7.6)

78.   General solution for effects of initial condition and switched DC sources (pg. 298)

HW #9 DUE

35 

12/3

Second-Order Circuits (CH 8)

79.   Series RLC natural response (8.3)

80.   Series RLC step response (8.5), including unstable response for negative resistance

LAB REPORT 11 DUE

 

Mathematica® notebook based on Ex. 8.7 of the text is available here

WEEK 15

MAKE-UP LABS
(you must have permission from the course instructor to perform a make-up lab)

36 

12/6

81.   Parallel RLC step response (8.6)

82.   General Second Order Circuits (8.7)

 

37 

12/8

Final Exam Review

NOTE:  Sample exams are for practice only; your exam might not look anything like these!
Final Exam Spring 2015

Final Exam Summer I 2015

Final Exam Fall 2015

Final Exam Spring 2016

Final Exam Fall 2016

Final Exam Spring 2017

Final Exam Summer I 2017

Final Exam Fall 2017

Final Exam Spring 2018

Final Exam Fall 2018

Final Exam Spring 2019

Final Exam Summer I 2019

Final Exam Fall 2019

 

38 

12/10

Review graded Exam #2

Course wrap-up

Accelerated master’s programs
Encourage instructor evaluation participation

 

Advanced Topics (OPTIONAL)

(lecture available on ELearning)

83.   Nonlinear chaotic Chua’s Circuit

LAB 12 REPORT DUE
HW #10 DUE

 

 

Advanced Topics (optional):
Skim Kennedy papers [11][12] in references. [13] and [14] are excellent dynamical systems texts.

 

Simulate Chua’s Circuit. The LTspice® file is available via a link in this syllabus.

 

View Chaotic Waterwheel video

WEEK 16

39 

TUE
12/14

 

FINAL EXAM (cumulative)

10:15AM-12:15PM
(no calculators, bring WMU ID)
Verify date/time on your own.
Cumulative