ECE 3200 Electronics II

Spring 2018
version 19 January 2018

The online version of this syllabus at http://homepages.wmich.edu/~miller/ECE3200.html provides hyperlinks and will be updated as needed.  In case of conflict, information in this syllabus supersedes all other course documents.

 

Instructor

Dr. Damon A. Miller, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Western Michigan University, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Parkview Campus, Room A-240, 269.276.3158, 269.276.3151 (fax), damon.miller@wmich.edu, www.homepages.wmich.edu/~miller/.

Office Hours

Guaranteed office hours are posted on Dr. Miller’s door and at http://homepages.wmich.edu/~miller/. Please respect instructor office hours.  Other times are available by appointment. In addition to Dr. Miller’s office hours, you can get help from any of the lab instructors during their office hours.

Laboratory Instructors

Laboratory sessions are held in the Electronics Laboratory, Room B-216 CEAS. Laboratory instructor office hours will be provided in lab.

T 2:30PM-5:10PM

Mr. Al Gailani

mohammedyasser.algailani@wmich.edu

T 6:30PM-9:10PM

Mr. Al Gailani

 

W 6:30PM-9:10PM

Mr. Al Gailani

 

 

Catalog Description

Design, analysis, simulation, and laboratory evaluation of electronic amplifiers, filters, and nonlinear signal shaping circuits composed of transistors, diodes, and integrated circuits. Transient response and steady state frequency response behavior for both small and large signal excitation conditions. Amplifier macro-model description and synthesis is introduced.
Prerequisites and Corequisites:  ECE 2210 and ECE 3100; with a grade of “C” or better in all prerequisites.

 

Acknowledgements

 

Some lecture notes (and figures) may be verbatim from the course text or references.

 

ECE 3200 Course Learning Outcomes

 

This course develops:  TBD


 

Textbook and Materials (lecture)

 

Required:

  1. A. Sedra and K. C. Smith, Microelectronic Circuits, Oxford University Press, 7th edition, 2015.
  2. Calculator from the list at https://ncees.org/exams/calculator/

References (also see course schedule):

  1. J. A. Cadzow and H. F. Van Landingham, Signals, Systems, and Transforms, Prentice-Hall, Inc., New Jersey, 1985.

2.      M. Hajimorad and B. Hung, Bode Plots by [H]and and by [MATLAB®],

http://www-inst.eecs.berkeley.edu/~ee40/su06/lectures/Bode_Plots.pdf

3.      Companion website for course text: https://global.oup.com/us/companion.websites/9780199339136/

4.      Text appendices: http://global.oup.com/us/companion.websites/9780199339136/student/app/

5.      W. Kester, What the Nyquist Criterion Means to Your Sampled Data System Design, Analog Devices Tutorial MT-002, 2008.

  1. Weisstein, Eric W. "Fourier Series." From MathWorld--A Wolfram Web Resource. http://mathworld.wolfram.com/FourierSeries.html
  2. R. Mancini (Editor in Chief), Op Amps for Everyone, Texas Instruments, August 2002, available at http://web.mit.edu/6.101/www/reference/op_amps_everyone.pdf

Recommended:

  1. A high level mathematics software suite is useful but not required for course assignments.  Such packages are practically indispensable for your senior design project. These packages are typically offered to students at significantly reduced rates. Pick one and master it for use throughout your academic and professional career:

a.      The MathWorks®, MATLAB® & SIMULINK® (student version).  This is a tremendous value as this package includes many toolboxes and blocksets that must be purchased separately for use in a professional version. Use this opportunity to learn MATLAB®; this is one of the most widely used software packages, especially in electrical engineering.

b.      Wolfram Research, Mathematica®.  This is a remarkable, unified symbolic approach to computing.  Visit http://www.mathematica.com/ to see some of the extraordinary capabilities of this package developed by Stephen Wolfram.

c.      MapleSoft®, MapleTM, available on main campus.

  1. S. Wolf and R. F. M. Smith, Student Reference Manual for Electronic Instrumentation Laboratories, Pearson Prentice Hall, 1990 (1st ed.) or 2004 (2nd ed.). Available for checkout in the ECE office.

Textbook and Materials (laboratory)

Required:

  1. R. R. Gejji, J. Gesink, and D. A. Miller, ECE 3200 Laboratory Manual.  This manual is accessible online at http://homepages.wmich.edu/~miller/ECE3200.html. It is your responsibility to check the manual for updates as the semester progresses.
  2. Digital multimeter (or equivalent):   http://www.elexp.com/ProductDetails.aspx?item_no=01DMMS8264&CatId=
  3. Safety glasses meeting ANSI Z87.1, e.g.
    http://www.elexp.com/ProductDetails.aspx?item_no=060373&CatId=
    Glasses must have side protection.
    Students will not be admitted to the lab without safety glasses
    .
  4. Linear Technology, LTspice, available at no cost at http://www.linear.com/designtools/software/.  This software will be used to simulate circuits.  You are responsible for ensuring access to a working copy.

 

SPICE EXAMPLES

 

a.      VCCS example (problem 4.43 from Nilsson and Reidel, Electric Circuits, 8th ed.)

b.      CCCS and CCVS example (problem 4.51 from Nilsson and Reidel Electric Circuits, 8th ed.)

c.      VCVS example (simple operational amplifier model)

d.      Chua’s “Simple” Chaotic Circuit (need the National Semiconductor LM741 model available as part of laboratory six in the course schedule below)

 

  1. Laboratory notebook, permanently bound, not loose leaf, 8.5 inches x 11 inches, 60 pages minimum, quadrille ruled (each page has a square grid), no carbon paper pages.  Two options that should work well:
    1. A “Science Notebook” with college-ruled pages on one side and a grid with 10 squares/inch on the other that was available in the bookstore; or
    2. A Roaring Springs “GRAPH PAPER NOTEBOOK QUAD RULED – 5 SQUARES PER INCH” notebook.

 

  1. Ruler
  2. Calculator
  3. Pen
  4. Bring course textbook to lab.

Course Policies

Academic Honesty

General:

“Students are responsible for making themselves aware of and understanding the University policies and procedures that pertain to Academic Honesty. These policies include cheating, fabrication, falsification and forgery, multiple submission, plagiarism, complicity and computer misuse. The academic policies addressing Student Rights and Responsibilities can be found in the Undergraduate Catalog at [http://catalog.wmich.edu/index.php] and the Graduate Catalog at [http://catalog.wmich.edu/index.php]. If there is reason to believe you have been involved in academic dishonesty, you will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. You will be given the opportunity to review the charge(s) and if you believe you are not responsible, you will have the opportunity for a hearing. You should consult with your instructor if you are uncertain about an issue of academic honesty prior to the submission of an assignment or test.

Students and instructors are responsible for making themselves aware of and abiding by the “Western Michigan University Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment and Violence, Intimate Partner Violence, and Stalking Policy and Procedures” related to prohibited sexual misconduct under Title IX, the Clery Act and the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and Campus Safe. Under this policy, responsible employees (including instructors) are required to report claims of sexual misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator or designee (located in the Office of Institutional Equity). Responsible employees are not confidential resources. For a complete list of resources and more information about the policy see www.wmich.edu/sexualmisconduct.

In addition, students are encouraged to access the Code of Conduct, as well as resources and general academic policies on such issues as diversity, religious observance, and student disabilities:

·        Office of Student Conduct www.wmich.edu/conduct

·        Division of Student Affairs www.wmich.edu/students/diversity

·        University Relations Office http://www.wmich.edu/registrar/calendars/interfaith

·        Disability Services for Students www.wmich.edu/disabilityservices

— provided by the WMU Faculty Senate Professional Concerns Committee

Plagiarism:

For an in-depth exploration of plagiarism, see http://lib.usm.edu/plagiarism_tutorial.html

Grading Basis

  1. Examinations (2 or more in-semester plus final): 60%
    Due to the class size requests for early or late examinations cannot be approved.
  2. Homework and Quizzes (announced or unannounced): 10%
  3. Laboratory:  30%

OUTSTANDING WORK might earn extra credit.  The first student to report an error in any material prepared by the course instructor will earn extra credit.  The course grading scale is:

 

Scale: 0-60 E | 60-65 D | 65-70 DC | 70-75 C | 75-80 CB | 80-85 B | 85-90 BA | 90-100 A |

Students earning less than a “C” in the laboratory will be assigned a failing course grade.

A grade of “X” will be assigned to any student that earns below 60% and does not complete all examinations including the final.

A midterm grade, if assigned, serves only as an indication of your progress in the course, and should not be considered as a predictor of your final grade.

Testing Accommodations:  If you have been approved for alternative testing, you must arrange to take your exams at the Disability Services for Students testing facility.  Note that the exam dates are available in this syllabus.

Grade Appeals:  If you have a question regarding grading of any lecture or laboratory materials (e.g. exam problems, homework problems, laboratory notebooks, laboratory reports, etc.), see Dr. Miller within FIVE business days of receiving the grade for the assignment in question.  If you disagree with the assessment of that assignment at that meeting, you must submit a written description of your concern to Dr. Miller via his ECE Department mailbox (not email) within five business days of that meeting.

Other

Students are expected to attend all lectures (note possibility of unannounced quizzes) and to be on time (assignments are collected at the beginning of class). Electronic devices, including cameras, are to be turned off (unless there is a safety issue or other documented reason) during lecture unless prior arrangements have been made with the instructor.

LABORATORY

 

Lab attendance is mandatory. Only under extremely unusual circumstances will make-up laboratories be considered.  Religious observances will be accommodated with advanced notice.  If an emergency prevents you from attending a laboratory or arriving on-time, contact your instructor PRIOR to the lab or as soon as you can, either by sending an email or leaving a message with the ECE Department Office at 276-3150.  Failure to adhere to this policy will result in zero credit for the lab and any other activities (e.g. quizzes) conducted in lab on the day of the absence. Arriving late to lab (i.e. after the posted start time) without a valid excuse will result in zero credit for the quiz and potentially zero credit for the lab and any other activities conducted during that session.  There is no obligation to provide makeup lab sessions for unexcused tardy or absent students.

 

While experimental data is collected in groups, all other laboratory activities must be completed individually.  Additional laboratory requirements will be presented in the first laboratory meeting.

 

 

 

Grading Basis

 

Your laboratory grade will be determined using the following evaluation criteria:

 

1.      Laboratory technique including demonstration of an ability to make appropriate observations and accurately and satisfactorily record observations and data in writing in a laboratory notebook (50%). Lab notebooks provide a convenient and professional method of organizing and storing your lab work and records.  Your laboratory notebook will be evaluated several times during the semester for neatness, organization, technical accuracy, and completeness.  Specific guidelines for the notebook will be provided in the laboratory.  Unless otherwise indicated, pre-lab assignments must be completed and inlcuded in your lab notebook before coming to lab. Each laboratory must be initialed by the lab instructor. Signatures will be made in only two cases:

a.      the laboratory is complete including the results section (LAB COMPLETE signature);

b.      the lab session is over (IN PROGRESS signature). For this case a second LAB COMPLETE signature is required by the end of the next lab session.

Laboratory notebooks are due several times during the semester as announced in the online syllabus and/or lab and/or via email to wmich.edu email addresses.  Late laboratory notebooks will not be accepted except under extremely unusual circumstances.

2.      Pre-lab assignments and/or quizzes and/or post-lab assignments (30%). Quizzes are closed book; however, you may use your laboratory notebook on quizzes. Sources of quiz questions include previous labs and the current week’s pre-lab assignment and may require calculations. Pre-lab assignments are due at the beginning of lab.  Post-lab assignments are due when noted.

3.      Laboratory report(s) (20%). Report(s) will be assigned in lecture and (as with homework) are due at the beginning of lecture. You must have attended the lab in order to prepare a lab report for that lab.

 

Failure to follow safe laboratory procedures as described in lab will result in removal from the lab and failure in the course.

 

EXAMINATIONS AND QUIZZES will be closed-notes closed-book unless otherwise noted. You must have a WMU issued ID with you at the exam. No hats or hoods may be worn during exams; seating might be randomized; all electronic devices except an approved calculator including watches must be stowed away; a pencil will be provided. If you observe an apparent incident of academic misconduct, please alert Dr. Miller.

 

Only under extremely unusual circumstances will make-up examinations and quizzes be considered.  If an emergency prevents you from attending a scheduled examination or quiz, contact your instructor PRIOR to the test or as soon as you can. If the instructor cannot be reached directly, leave a message with the ECE Department (276-3150). Failure to adhere to this policy will result in zero credit for the exercise.

 

Use of Calculators:  Only calculators listed at https://ncees.org/exams/calculator/ may be used on exams.

HOMEWORK

ALL homework assignments will be announced in class and/or posted online. Homework assignments with missing or illegible names will not receive credit and may or may not be returned.

 

Homework due dates will be given in class. Homework is due at the beginning of lecture.  Each homework problem must be worked on separate page(s).  LATE HOMEWORK will not be accepted, except under extraordinary circumstances. Homework is to be completed individually.

 

Homework should normally be done on 8 1/2'' by 11'' sheets. “Engineer's Pad” sheets are preferred.  Solutions must be done in a neat, structured, logical, and orderly manner with frequent brief notations enabling the grader to readily verify the author's source of information, steps taken, sources of formula, equations, and methods used. USE THE PARTIAL CHECK LIST FOR SUBMITTED HOMEWORK BELOW.  Papers failing to meet these guidelines may not be graded and may be returned, with or without an opportunity for resubmission with a penalty.

 

PARTIAL CHECK LIST FOR SUBMITTED HOMEWORK

 

1.      Each problem must include: (a) author's name, (b) name/title of the assignment, and (c) date of completion.  PUT YOUR LABORATORY MEETING DAY AND TIME IN THE UPPER RIGHT HAND CORNER.

2.      Use only one side of the paper and include a brief and concise statement of the problem prior to its solution. Begin each problem on a new page.

3.      Number the pages and DOUBLE SPACE the text.

4.      Staple each problem in the upper left corner as needed.

5.      Entitle graphs, label and include axes, include key symbols for multiple curve graphs, and give brief notes of explanation where appropriate.

6.      Briefly but clearly annotate your document in a way which will provide the document reader with information such as

a.      which part of the assignment is this?

b.      what is being done and why?

c.      how was it done and what are the results?

d.      how was this equation obtained and how was it used?

e.      sample calculations and definitions of symbols/parameters where appropriate; and

f.       BOX AND LABEL ANSWERS.

 

Course Schedule
(a tentative schedule for the semester was provided in class; the online schedule will be frequently updated as the semester progresses)

 

 

#

date

topic (related text section)

assignments

WEEK 1

NO LAB

 1 

1/8

Syllabus

Course and lab introduction

Lab safety

Sampling of continuous time signals

A/D and D/A converters

read syllabus, CH 1 (S&S), Appendix E (S&S), http://mathworld.wolfram.com/FourierSeries.html

 

read Analog Devices tutorial MT-002 “What the Nyquist Criterion Means to Your  Sampled Data System Design” by W. Kester available at http://www.analog.com/media/en/training-seminars/tutorials/MT-002.pdf

 

read all documents related to LAB 1

 

acquire safety glasses and multimeter

 

Explore
http://lib.usm.edu/plagiarism_tutorial.html

 

HW #1 DUE 1/17

Use LTspice to plot equation 1.2 of S&S for five terms; do this by using series connected voltage sources of the appropriate frequencies and phases.

S&S Appendix E:  1, 2, 3

 2 

1/10

A/D and D/A converters

Analog and digital signals
Aliasing

A “typical” electronic system

 

 3 

1/12

linear systems; frequency spectrum; RMS; Fourier series applications

 

LTspice and LAB 2 preparation

read CH 2 (S&S)

 

See http://www.sosmath.com/fourier/fourier1/fourier1.html for a review of Fourier Series


WEEK 2

LAB 1:  SafetyAndEquipmentFamiliarizationLaboratory.pdf

ECE3200LaboratoryManualFrontMatter.pdf

ECE3200LaboratoryGuidelines.pdf

Prelab due at beginning of lab.

Lab 1 exercises due 1/26 at beginning of class

 

1/15

NO CLASS:  MLK DAY

 

 4 

1/17

Oscilloscope Compensation Circuit in time and frequency domain
LAB 3 preparation

HW #1 DUE

 5 

1/19

Amplifiers:  Characteristics, Models, and Frequency Response
S&S 1.4.8 Symbol Convention

HW #2 S&S
CH 1:  25, 36, 37, 38, 39, 41, 44, 45, 46, 50, 69, 77, 80
DUE 1/29

WEEK 3

LAB 2:  PassiveBandpassFilterDesign.pdf

f0=2kHz;Q=0.3;Tp=-10.5dB

NO QUIZ THIS WEEK

Example: UsingLTspiceToPrepareBodePlot.asc

"Bode Plots by hand and by MatLab" (external link)

Mathematica® notebook (as a .pdf file) describing how to use Fourier Series to compute output of a RC circuit:  FourierSeries.nb

Lab 2 exercises due 2/2 at beginning of class

 6 

1/22

 

 

 7 

1/24

Single Time Constant Networks

Steady State and Transient Response; 

 

 8 

1/26

 

 

WEEK 4

LAB NOTEBOOKS DUE: LABS 1-2 TO BE GRADED
LAB 3:  Active Bandpass Filter Design
f0=1kHz;Q=3;Tp=25.1dB
NationalSemiconductorModels.lib (contains model of LM741 from National Semiconductor)
Put this file in the same directory as your LTspice schematic and put the SPICE directive “.include NationalSemiconductorModels.lib” in your schematic.  Place the “opamp2” operational amplifier model part in your schematic, right click on the part, set “SpiceModel” and “Value” to LM741/NS.  You need voltage sources for power supplies!
Lab 3 exercises due 2/9 at beginning of class

 9 

1/29

Operational Amplifiers:  Introduction, Inverting Amplifier, Input and Output Resistance, Ideal Integrator

HW #2 DUE

Read CH 1 (The Op Amp’s Place in the World by R. Mancini) of R. Mancini (Editor in Chief), Op Amps for Everyone, Texas Instruments, August 2002, available at

http://web.mit.edu/6.101/www/reference/op_amps_everyone.pdf

10 

1/31

 

 

11 

2/2

Discuss LAB 4a; Operational Amplifier Circuits:  Practical Integrator, Summer, Differentiator, Non-Inverting Amplifier, Voltage Buffer

 

WEEK 5

LAB NOTEBOOKS RETURNED
LAB 4a: 
Transfer Functions, Parameters, and Equivalent Circuits of Linear Amplifiers, Part A
R3=1k;R4=24k;R5=510;R6=56k;R7=3.3k;R8=1MEG
Lab 4a exercises due 2/16 at beginning of class

12 

2/5

 

 

13 

2/7

Discuss LAB 4b; Operational Amplifiers:  Voltmeter, Difference Amplifier, CMRR, Instrumentation Amplifier, Negative Resistance Circuit, Research Application

 

14 

2/9

 

Read S&S CH 11: sections 1 to 2

WEEK 6

LAB 4b:  Transfer Functions, Parameters, and Equivalent Circuits of Linear Amplifiers, Part B

Lab 4b exercises due 2/23 at beginning of class

15 

2/12

Operational Amplifiers:  Frequency Effects and Gain/Bandwidth Tradeoff;  Operational Amplifier Circuits as Negative Feedback Systems; Sensitivity

 

16 

2/14

 

 

17 

2/16

Discuss LAB 4c;

Operational Amplifier Circuits:  Benefits of Feedback

 

WEEK 7

LAB NOTEBOOKS DUE: LABS 3-4b TO BE GRADED
LAB 4c: 
Transfer Functions, Parameters, and Equivalent Circuits of Linear Amplifiers, Part C

Lab 4c exercises due 3/12 at beginning of class

18 

2/19

 

 

19 

2/21

Operational Amplifier Circuits:  Large Signal Operation; DC Imperfections
Discuss Lab 5

 

20 

2/23

 

 

WEEK 8

LAB NOTEBOOKS RETURNED

LAB 5: Design of a Temperature Measurement Circuit (NEW)
Performance specifications will be provided in class.

Lab 5 report due 3/23

21 

2/26

Operational Amplifier Circuits:  CMRR; Operational Amplifiers:  Input and Output Resistance

Discuss LAB 4c exercise

 

22 

2/28

EXAM 1

 

 

3/2

NO CLASS:  SPIRIT DAY

 

WEEK 9

MAKE-UP/OPEN LAB

23 

3/12

Review MOSFET Basics
Emphasize sign of transconductance

Example MOSFET Simulations

Read S&S CH 8 to 8.2, CMOS material only
Read S&S CH 9.1, 9.5.2, 9.6.1

24 

3/14

MOS current mirrors

 

25 

3/16

The Current-Mirror-Loaded MOS Differential Pair [S&S 9.5.2]

 

 

WEEK 10

LAB NOTEBOOKS DUE: LABS 4c to 5 TO BE GRADED

LAB 6: Simulation of a CMOS OpAmp (NEW)

26 

3/19

LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW

A Two Stage CMOS Op Amp

[S&S 9.61]

Discuss Lab 6

Read S&S CH 11.7-11.10

27 

3/21

Stability and Frequency Compensation in Negative Feedback Systems

 

28 

3/23

 

Read S&S 12.8.2 and 12.10

WEEK 11

LAB NOTEBOOKS RETURNED

LAB 7:  Frequency Compensation of an Operational Amplifier

(While the frequency compensation lab is a simulation experiment, you must attend lab)

LAB 7 exercises due 4/6

29 

3/26

Power Amplifiers

Read S&S CH 17.1-17.3, 17.11

30 

3/28

Butterworth and Chebyshev Filters
[S&S 17.3]
Discuss LAB 8

 

31 

3/30

EXAM 2

 

WEEK 12

LAB NOTEBOOKS DUE: LABS 6-7 TO BE GRADED

LAB 8a: Design of an Anti-Aliasing Filter (NEW)

Performance specifications will be provided in class.

Lab 8 report due 4/13

32 

4/2

Switched-Capacitor Filters
[S&S 17.11]

 

33 

4/4

 

 

34 

4/6

Oscillators

Read S&S 18.1, 18.4-18.5

WEEK 13

MAKE-UP/OPEN LAB

35 

4/9

 

 

36 

4/11

Discuss LAB 9

 

37 

4/13

 

 

WEEK 14

LAB NOTEBOOKS RETURNED
LAB 9 NOTEBOOK GRADED AND RETURNED TO STUDENTS IN LAB

LAB 9:  Oscillator Circuits

No exercises assigned.

38 

4/16

 

 

39 

4/18

 

 

40 

4/20

course wrap-up
encourage instructor evaluation participation

 

WEEK 15

41 

TBD

FINAL EXAM

(verify this day/time on your own)

 

© 2018 Damon A. Miller. All rights reserved.

Return to Dr. Miller’s homepage