ECE 5800 System Modeling and Simulation

 

Summer I 2014
version 25 June 2014

The online version of this syllabus at http://homepages.wmich.edu/~miller/ECE5800.html has hyperlinks and will be updated as needed.

Instructor
Dr. Damon A. Miller, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Western Michigan University, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Parkview Campus, Room A-240, 269.276.3158, 269.276.3151 (fax),
damon.miller@wmich.edu, www.homepages.wmich.edu/~miller/.

Office Hours
Guaranteed office hours are posted on Dr. Miller’s door and at
http://homepages.wmich.edu/~miller/. Please respect my office hours.  Other times are available by appointment.

Description (WMU Graduate Catalog)
ECE 5800 System Modeling and Simulation, 3 hrs. “This is a first course in the principles of mathematical modeling of stochastic and deterministic systems. It will focus on analytical models, mathematical rigor and computer simulation of problems. Students will simulate a number of systems using appropriate stochastic and deterministic models using a computer.” Prerequisites:  ECE graduate standing.

Acknowledgment
Dr. Frank Severance provided extensive guidance and example materials to the course instructor based on previous offerings of this course.

 

Textbook and Materials

Required:

1.      Frank L. Severance, System Modeling and Simulation: An Introduction, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2001.

2.      The MathWorks, MATLAB®, available at the WMU bookstore.  Any reasonably recent version will suffice.  The CAE center provides access to this software.

3.      LTspice IV, Linear Technology SPICE Simulator, available at http://www.linear.com/designtools/software/

 

Recommended:

 

1.      C. Moler, Numerical Computing with MATLAB, available at http://www.mathworks.com/moler/chapters.html (see that webpage for use restrictions).

References:

Texts:

1.      R. A. DeCarlo, Linear Systems:  A State Variable Approach With Numerical Implementation, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1989.

2.      W. H. Press, S. A. Teukolsky, W. T. Vetterling, and B. P. Flannery, Numerical Recipes in C, Cambridge University Press, 1997.

3.      M. E. Van Valkenburg, Network Analysis, 3rd ed., Prentice-Hall, 1974.

4.      C. L. Phillips and H. Troy Nagle, Digital Control System Analysis and Design, Prentice Hall, 1995.

5.      R. E. Walpole and R. H. Myers, Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists, 3rd ed., Macmillan, 1985.

Online:

1.      J. Mellor-Crummey, “Testing Random Number Generators,” COMP 528 Lecture 22, http://www.cs.rice.edu/~johnmc/comp528/lecture-notes/Lecture22.pdf, April 2005.

2.      Penn State STAT 414/STAT 415, “The Chi-Square Table,” https://onlinecourses.science.psu.edu/stat414/node/147 .

3.      J. Carlson, “Random Numbers,” Mathematics 217: Introduction to Mathematical Computation, http://www.math.utah.edu/classes/217/assignment.03.html, 1995.

 

Course Policies

Academic Honesty

General:

“You are responsible for making yourself aware of and understanding the policies and procedures in the Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs that pertain to Academic Honesty. These policies include cheating, fabrication, falsification and forgery, multiple submission, plagiarism, complicity and computer misuse. [The policies can be found at www.www.wmich.edu/catalog under Academic Policies, Student Rights and Responsibilities.] If there is reason to believe you have been involved in academic dishonesty, you will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. You will be given the opportunity to review the charge(s). If you believe you are not responsible, you will have the opportunity for a hearing. You should consult with me if you are uncertain about an issue of academic honesty prior to the submission of an assignment or test.” — provided by the Professional Concerns Committee of the WMU Faculty Senate

Plagiarism:

For an in-depth definition and discussion of plagiarism, see http://libguides.wmich.edu/plagiarism

Grading Basis

1.      Projects (80%) will be assigned on a regular basis.  LATE PROJECTS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED AND ARE DUE AT THE BEGINNING OF CLASS. All projects are to be completed individually.  Project may contain a series of homework style problems from the text.  Use the prescribed homework format for those problems. Be sure to follow the guidelines for computer assignments.

2.      Quizzes (20%) on course material e.g. reading assignments may be announced or unannounced.  If no quizzes are conducted the grade will be based solely on projects.

OUTSTANDING WORK might earn extra credit.

 

Scale: 0-60 E | 60-65 D | 65-70 DC | 70-75 C | 75-80 CB | 80-85 B | 85-90 BA | 90-100 A |

HOMEWORK contributes to the project grade category. Each homework problem must be worked on separate page(s).  LATE HOMEWORK will not be accepted, except under extraordinary circumstances. Homework is to be completed individually.

 

Homework should normally be done on 8 1/2'' by 11'' sheets. “Engineer's Pad” sheets are preferred.  Solutions must be done in a neat, structured, logical, and orderly manner with frequent brief notations enabling the grader to readily verify the author's source of information, steps taken, sources of formulas, equations, and methods used. USE THE PARTIAL CHECK LIST FOR SUBMITTED HOMEWORK BELOW.  Papers failing to meet these guidelines may not be graded and may be returned, with or without an opportunity for resubmission with a penalty.

 

PARTIAL CHECK LIST FOR SUBMITTED HOMEWORK

 

1.      Each problem must include: (a) author's name, (b) name/title of the assignment, and (c) date of completion.

2.      Use only one side of the paper and include a brief and concise statement of the problem prior to its solution. Begin each problem on a new page.

3.      Number the pages and DOUBLE SPACE the text.

4.      Staple each problem in the upper left corner as needed.

5.      Entitle graphs, label and include axes, include key symbols for multiple curve graphs, and give brief notes of explanation where appropriate.

6.      Briefly but clearly annotate your document in a way which will provide the document reader with information such as

a.       which part of the assignment is this?

b.      what is being done and why?

c.       how was it done and what are the results?

d.      how was this equation obtained and how was it used?

e.       sample calculations and definitions of symbols/parameters where appropriate; and

f.       BOX AND LABEL ANSWERS.

 

COMPUTER ASSIGNMENTS must be implemented via MATLAB®.  Computer assignments must include

1.      a problem statement;

2.      description of techniques utilized including pseudo-code (as in “listings” in the text);

3.      results;

4.      discussion of results; and

5.      computer code listing(s) attached as an appendix. Computer code must include explanatory comments. Some of those comments should relate computer code to the pseudo-code of item 2 above.  Use modular programming.

 

NOTE

In case of conflict, information in this syllabus supersedes all other course documents.

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

 

#

date

topic

(chapter/section numbers/titles are from the text)

assignment

CA=computer assignment

WEEK 1

1

TUE 5/6

course introduction

 

1 Describing Systems

1.1 The Nature of Systems

1.2 Event Driven Models

1.3 Characterizing Systems

1.4 Simulation Diagrams

1.5 The Systems Approach

 

homework hints

 

CLASS MEETS IN C-226 FOR REST OF SEMESTER

Read Preface

CH 1:  Describing Systems

CH 2:  Dynamical Systems

 

Insure access to MATLAB®;

bring laptop OR USB stick to next class

 

Explore the website http://libguides.wmich.edu/plagiarism

Be able to define plagiarism and how to avoid it.

 

Project 1:  DUE 5/20:

CH 1:  1.1, 1.2 parts a and b (first “=’ in part b should be ‘+’), 1.4, 1.5 (extra credit), 1.8 (CA), 1.11 (CA)  

2

THU 5/8

MATLAB® Introduction: 

Project 1:  1.8(CA) working session

 

WEEK 2

3

TUE 5/13

2 Dynamical Systems

2.1 Initial-Value Problems

2.2 Higher-Order Systems

 

Review Project 2

(including Example 2.2 MATLAB™ solution)

 

Install LTspice on your computer

 

Project 2:  DUE 5/29

CH 2:  2.1 (use α(1)=0), 2.4 (CA) (note corrections provided in class), 2.5 (for t<=2 only)(CA)(also compare results to those obtained using LTspice),  2.18 (CA).

You cannot use MATLAB® differential equation numerical solvers except to check your results.

4

THU 5/15

MATLAB® questions

LTspice introduction

2.3 Autonomous Dynamic Systems

MATLAB working session

Read CH 3

WEEK 3

5

TUE 5/20

Project #2 questions

2.4 Multiple Time-Based Systems (overview)

2.5 Handling Empirical Data

3 Stochastic Generators

3.1 Uniformly Distributed Random Numbers

3.2 Statistical Properties of U[0,1] Generators

Project 3:  DUE 6/3

CH 3: 3.1 (CA), 3.3 (CA), 3.5 (CA), 3.9 (CA)

NOTE:  Use MATLAB® function rng(10) to seed rand() so that results can be verified

6

THU 5/22

Project #2 questions

3.2 Statistical Properties of U[0,1] Generators

3.3 Generation of Non-Uniform Random Variates

3.4 Generation of Arbitrary Random Variates

 

WEEK 4

7

TUE 5/27

Project #2 questions

 

8

THU 5/29

Project #3 questions

3.5 Random Processes

 

WEEK 5

9

TUE 6/3

3.5 Random Processes

3.6 Characterizing Random Processes

Discuss Project #4

Project 4:  DUE 6/17

CH 3:  14 (CA)(validate your hand calculations with simulations), 28 (CA) (validate your hand calculations with simulations), 33 (CA), 38 (CA)

10

THU 6/5

Review Project #1

3.7 Generating Random Processes

3.8 Random Walks

3.9 White Noise

Read CH  4

WEEK 6

11

TUE 6/10

Discuss returned Project 2

Discuss Project 4

4 Discrete Systems

4.1 Sampled Systems

4.2 Spatial Systems

 

12

THU 6/12

Discuss returned Project 3

Discuss Project 4

4.3 Finite-Difference Formulae 

Read CH 5

 

Project 5: 

DUE  6/24:  4.12 (CA), 5.1

WEEK 7

13

TUE 6/17

4.4 Partial Differential Equations

4.5 Finite Differences for Partial Derivatives

4.6 Constraint Propagation

5 Stochastic Data Representation

5.1 Random Process Models

Discuss Project 5

 

14

THU 6/19

IN-CLASS WORKING SESSION

 

WEEK 8

15

TUE 6/24

IN-CLASS WORKING SESSION

course wrap-up

[instructor evaluation is online]

 

 

6/25

ALL PROJECTS DUE IN DR. MILLER”S MAIL BOX IN THE ECE DEPARTMENT BY 5PM OR UNDER HIS OFFICE DOOR BY 7PM

 

 

Credits

 

Adapted in part from syllabi by J. Gesink.

© 2014 Damon A. Miller

 

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