ECE 6730 Advanced Neural Networks

 

Spring 2014
updated 21 September 2016

The online version of this syllabus at http://homepages.wmich.edu/~miller/ECE6730.html has hyperlinks and will be updated as needed

Instructor

Dr. Damon A. Miller, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Western Michigan University, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Parkview Campus, Room A-240, 269.276.3158, 269.276.3151 (fax), damon.miller@wmich.edu, www.homepages.wmich.edu/~miller/.

Office Hours

Guaranteed office hours are posted on Dr. Miller’s door and at http://homepages.wmich.edu/~miller/. Please respect my office hours.  Other times are available by appointment.

WMU Catalog Description

ECE 6730 Artificial Neural Networks, 3 hrs. Advanced topics in biological and artificial neural networks from an electrical and computer engineering perspective. Modeling, simulation, and implementation of neural networks. Information theory and knowledge representation. Adaptation and learning. Review of current research.

 

NOTE:  ECE 6730 will focus on a nonlinear dynamical system perspective of neural networks this semester.

 

Textbook and Materials

Required:

1.  E. M. Izhikevich, Dynamical Systems in Neuroscience:  The Geometry of Excitability and Bursting, The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2007.

2.  Linear Technology, LTspice® IV, available at no cost at http://www.linear.com/designtools/software/.  This software will be used to simulate circuits and is available in the CAE center.  You are responsible for ensuring access to a working copy.

Recommended:

1.  The MathWorks, MATLAB® & SIMULINK®, available at www.academicsuperstore.com or the WMU bookstore.  This is a tremendous value as this package includes many toolboxes and blocksets that must be purchased separately for professional use. Any reasonably recent version will suffice.

 

Online References:

 

1.  E. Young, 580.439 Course Notes: Nonlinear Dynamics and Hodgkin-Huxley Equations, John Hopkins University, available as of January 2013 at www.jhu.edu/motn/coursenotes/nonlinear.pdf‎.

1.  J. Moore, NEURON [simulation environment] website.

2.  E. M. Izhikevich, www.izhikevich.org.

 

Other References:

 

1.  Scott Freeman, Biological Science, Prentice Hall, 2nd edition.

2.  W. Otto Friesen and J. A. Friesen, NeuroDynamix II:  Concepts of Neurophysiology Illustrated by Computer Simulations, Oxford University Press, 2010 (ISBN 978-0-19-537183-3).

3.  E. Ott, Chaos in Dynamical Systems, Cambridge University Press, 1993.

4.  A. S. Sedra and K. C. Smith, Microelectronic Circuits, 4th ed., Oxford University Press, 1998.

 

Course Policies

Academic Honesty

General:

“You are responsible for making yourself aware of and understanding the policies and procedures in the Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs that pertain to Academic Honesty. These policies include cheating, fabrication, falsification and forgery, multiple submission, plagiarism, complicity and computer misuse. [The policies can be found at www.www.wmich.edu/catalog under Academic Policies, Student Rights and Responsibilities.] If there is reason to believe you have been involved in academic dishonesty, you will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. You will be given the opportunity to review the charge(s). If you believe you are not responsible, you will have the opportunity for a hearing. You should consult with me if you are uncertain about an issue of academic honesty prior to the submission of an assignment or test.” — provided by the Professional Concerns Committee of the WMU Faculty Senate

Plagiarism:

For an in-depth definition and discussion of plagiarism, see http://www.ohio.edu/linguistics/info/plagiarism.html.
That website includes tutorials on how to insure that you never plagiarize another’s work.

Grading Basis

1.      Projects (70%) will be assigned on a regular basis. You may not use any sources other than those provided in class or in this syllabus when preparing your project report without prior approval from the course instructor.  You may be asked to demonstrate your project. LATE PROJECTS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED AND ARE DUE AT THE BEGINNING OF CLASS. All projects are to be completed individually.

2.      Examinations (1 or more):  20%. A final project might constitute all or part of the final exam.

3.      Homework and Quizzes (announced or unannounced):  10%

OUTSTANDING WORK might earn extra credit.

 

Scale: 0-60 E | 60-65 D | 65-70 DC | 70-75 C | 75-80 CB | 80-85 B | 85-90 BA | 90-100 A |

EXAMINATIONS AND QUIZZES will be closed-notes closed-book unless otherwise noted. You must have a WMU issued ID with you at the exam.

 

Only under extremely unusual circumstances will make-up examinations and quizzes be considered.  Religious observances will be accommodated with advanced notice.  If an emergency prevents you from attending a scheduled examination or quiz, contact your instructor PRIOR to the test or as soon as you can reach a telephone, e-mail terminal, etc. If the instructor cannot be reached directly, leave a message with the department (276-3150).  Failure to adhere to this policy will result in zero credit for the exercise.

 

Use of Calculators

When a calculator is allowed on a quiz/exam, without exception only models accepted by the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination may be used; see http://ncees.org/about-ncees/news/2013-approved-calculator-list-announced/ for a list of approved calculators.

HOMEWORK is assigned in class.  Each homework problem must be worked on separate page(s).  LATE HOMEWORK will not be accepted, except under extraordinary circumstances. Homework is to be completed individually.

 

Homework should normally be done on 8 1/2'' by 11'' sheets. “Engineer's Pad” sheets are preferred.  Solutions must be done in a neat, structured, logical, and orderly manner with frequent brief notations enabling the grader to readily verify the author's source of information, steps taken, sources of formula, equations, and methods used. USE THE PARTIAL CHECK LIST FOR SUBMITTED HOMEWORK BELOW.  Papers failing to meet these guidelines may not be graded and may be returned, with or without an opportunity for resubmission with a penalty.

 

PARTIAL CHECK LIST FOR SUBMITTED HOMEWORK

 

1.      Each problem must include: (a) author's name, (b) name/title of the assignment, and (c) date of completion.

2.      Use only one side of the paper and include a brief and concise statement of the problem prior to its solution. Begin each problem on a new page.

3.      Number the pages and DOUBLE SPACE the text.

4.      Staple each problem in the upper left corner as needed.

5.      Entitle graphs, label and include axes, include key symbols for multiple curve graphs, and give brief notes of explanation where appropriate.

6.      Briefly but clearly annotate your document in a way which will provide the document reader with information such as

a.      which part of the assignment is this?

b.      what is being done and why?

c.      how was it done and what are the results?

d.      how was this equation obtained and how was it used?

e.      sample calculations and definitions of symbols/parameters where appropriate; and

f.       BOX AND LABEL ANSWERS.

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

Schedule subject to change. Religious observances will be accommodated with advanced notice.

 

class #

date

topic

(some topics are verbatim chapter/section titles from text as noted)

assignment

WEEK 1

    1 

1/9

course introduction

course syllabus

 

basic neurophysiology

action potentials

 

problems with the “classical” perspective of neuron behavior

 

dynamical systems and bifurcations

 

discuss project 1

Read preface, CH 1 of [Izhikevich 2007]

Explore http://www.ohio.edu/linguistics/info/plagiarism.html

 

Read CH 2 of text

 

Obtain and read the first two sections of the article “An Improved Parameter Estimation Method for Hodgkin-Huxley Models,” A. R. Willms, D. J. Baro, R. M. Harris-Warrick, and J. Guckenheimer, Journal of Computational Neuroscience, vol. 6, pp. 145-268, 1999.

Project 1:  Bifurcation Diagrams, Phase Portraits, and Neuron Simulation
DUE 1/23

WEEK 2

    2 

1/16

Hodgkin Classification

[1.2.3 of Izhikevich 2007]

 

Neurocomputational Properties

[1.2.4 of Izhikevich 2007]

 

Electrophysiology of Neurons

[CH 2 of Izhikevich 2007]

 

corrected circuit model of neuron membrane

 

action potential from the Hodgkin-Huxley model

[see 2.3 of Izhikevich 2007]

 

Dendritic Compartments

[2.3.4 of Izhikevich 2007]

 

One-Dimensional Systems

[CH 3 of Izhikevich 2007]

Read  notes by E. Young:
http://www.jhu.edu/motn/coursenotes/nonlinear.pdf

WEEK 3

    3 

1/23

One-Dimensional Systems

[CH 3 of Izhikevich 2007]

 

Two-Dimensional Systems

[CH 4 of Izhikevich 2007]

HW #1:  DUE 1/30:  CH 3:  2,3,4,5,6,7,8,17

 

CH 3:  Project 2:  Simulation of Bifurcation Phenomena in a One-Dimensional Neuron Model
DUE 1/30

WEEK 4

    4 

1/30

Two-Dimensional Systems

[CH 4 of Izhikevich 2007]

 

Conductance-Based Models and Their Reductions

[CH 5 of Izhikevich 200

 

assign model behavior for project 3

HW #2: DUE 2/20: CH 4: 1,2,3,5,8,11

 

CH 4:  Project 3:  Simulation of Two-Dimensional Conductance-Based Neuron Models
(individual investigations on model behavior to be reported in class on 2/13)
DUE 2/13

WEEK 5

    5 

2/6

Bifurcations

[CH 6 of Izhikevich 2007]

 

assign model for project 4

CH 5:  Project 4:  Bifurcations in Neuronal Models
(demonstrate one type of bifurcation for assigned model to be reported in class on 2/20)
DUE 2/20

WEEK 6

    6 

2/13

in-class presentations of Projects 3

 

WEEK 7

    7 

2/20

in-class presentations of Project 4

assign bifurcation for project 5

 

Neuronal Excitability

[CH 7 of Izhikevich 2007]

Project 5:  CH 6:  Students assigned an individual investigation to be presented in class on 3/13

Example:  Explore one case from Figures 6.46 and 6.47 of the text.  Generate phase and time domain plots.  Explain results.
DUE 2/27

WEEK 8

    8 

2/27

in-class presentations of Project 5

 

Simple Models

[CH 8 of Izhikevich 2007]

Project 6: CH 7:  Students assigned an individual investigation to be presented in class on 3/13.

DUE 3/13

WEEK 9

    9 

3/13

in-class presentation of Project 6

 

Bursting

[CH 9 of Izhikevich 2007]

Project 7: CH 8:  Students assigned an individual investigation to be presented in class on 3/20.

DUE 3/20

WEEK 10

  10 

3/20

in-class presentations of Project 7

 

Synchronization

[CH 10 of Izhikevich 2007]

Project 8: CH 9:  Students assigned an individual investigation to be presented in class on 3/27.

DUE 3/27

WEEK 11

  11 

3/27

in-class presentations of Project 8

 

Synchronization

[CH 10 of Izhikevich 2007]

Project 9: CH 10:  Students assigned an individual investigation to be presented in class on 4/10.

DUE 4/10

WEEK 12

  12 

4/3

Lab Tour:  Dr. Jellies’ Lab

 

WEEK 13

  13 

4/10

in-class presentations of Project 9

discuss final project

Project 10:  CH 10:  Students assigned an individual investigation to be presented in class on 4/17.

DUE 4/17

WEEK 14

  14 

4/17

in-class working session

Project 11:  (due at final exam): Students investigate impact of concept presented and/or introduced in course text on research literature to be presented in class during final exam period

WEEK 15

  15 

4/24
7:15PM

FINAL EXAM

 

present project 9 as final exam

 

 

Credits

 

Adapted/adopted in part from syllabi by J. Gesink and J. Kelemen.

© 2014 Damon A. Miller. All rights reserved.


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