BIOS 1700 LIFE SCIENCE FOR NON-MAJORS

STUDY GUIDE FOR THE UNIT TWO PRACTICUM

 

A practicum is composed of a set of stations where students are given questions about a prepared specimen. During a practicum you will literally change seats to answer the next question. Each person starts with a different numbered question.

 

The practicum will consist of a set of ten questions, some of which have two parts. All will involve short answers: names or brief phrases. Each question is worth 2 pts, for a total of 20 pts. Questions will range over observations we have made of all stages of the life cycles of WI fast plants and cabbage white butterflies, lima bean plants, histology slides and dissected sheep hearts. (There will be NO questions on eggs or Lima bean seeds.) Some questions will invite you to identify parts or tissues; others will ask you to identify the function of the part, where blood goes next, or the type of blood that is carried in the structure. You will have up to three minutes per station, unless all students answering questions are willing to move on to the next station.

 

BIOS 1700 LIFE SCIENCE FOR NON-MAJORS

STUDY GUIDE FOR THE UNIT TWO EXAM

 

The exam will consist of eight questions worth a total of 80 points. One question will be worth 20 pts, others will be worth less.

 

You will be expected to solve problems similar to those you encountered in Chapter 4 of the BIOS 1700 Course Pack. You will NOT be expected to answer specific questions regarding national and state benchmarks. You will NOT be expected to answer problems like the pre-assessment problems at the start of the chapter.

 

You should be able to answer questions about common misconceptions children have about the life cycles of animals and plants (pp. 152, 162 and 176). Fifteen points of the exam will consist of multiple choice questions developed from the animal and plant life cycle films we have seen together in class.

 

You should be able to answer questions about some of the curious features we found in our exploration of the cardiovascular system, and in particular, be able to identify one form of evidence William Harvey used to reach a major conclusion about the cardiovascular system and why this evidence indeed supports his conclusion. You should also be familiar with the major differences between Galenšs account of the flow of blood in the body and our modern understanding. You will also be expected to trace the path of a single red blood cell through the body back to its starting place.

 

In addition to problems provided in Chapter 4, consult the "Extra Practice Problems for the Unit 2 Exam" pp. 459-464 of the course pack for examples of possible questions drawn from our laboratory activities.