Math 1230                          Calculus II                  Spring 2017


Instructor: Professor Jim Zhu
Office: 5516 EV, Tel: 387-4535, e-mail: zhu@wmich.edu
Web: http://homepages.wmich.edu/~zhu/
Office Hours: T. R. 9:50-10:40am and 1:50-2:40pm. Office:  EV5516
Class Hours:  M.T.R.F.9:00-9:50am. Rood Hall 03393
Text:  Thomas' Calculus, Early Transcendentals, single variable, 13th edition,
Course Description:

Math 1230 is the second of a three-semester sequence in differential and integral calculus. Topics include: techniques and applications of integrations, introduction to first odrder differential equations and infinite series. This roughly corresponds to Chapters 5-7 and part of Chapter 14 of the text. Students are responsible for all material in the text and all material presented in class. This includes any material not in the text and all material in the text that was not presented in class.

Calculus II Skill Exam:

Students must take a Skills Exam focusing on basic skills of differentiation and integration. Following the link here to login to MapleTA website for sample practice problems.

Course Prerequisites: A passing grade (C or better) in Math 1220 Calculus I or equivalent.

Academic Integrity: I am asked to include the following paragraph on academic integrity in this syllabus: Students are responsible for making themselve aware of and understanding the policies and procedures in the Undergraduate (pp. 274-276) [Graduate (pp.25-27)] Catalog that pertain to Academic Honesty. These policies include cheating, fabrication, falsification and forgery, multiple submission, plagiarism, complicity and computer misuse. If there is reason to believe you have been involved in academic dishonesty, you will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. You will be given the opportunity to review the charge(s). If you believe you are not responsible, you will have the opportunity for a hearing. You should consult with me if you are uncertain about an issue of academic honesty prior to the submission of an assignment or test.

Objectives:

1. Enhance the understanding of the concept of functions.
2. Understanding the concept of limit and how it relates average and instantaneous quantities.
3. Understanding the concept of derivative, interpreting it geometrically, physically and using it in optimization and linear approximation.
4. Understanding integration and its relationship with differentiation and applying integration in goemetrical and physical problems.
5. Learning the proper use of mathematical notation.
6. Developing sufficient computational skills in differential and integral operations for subsequent calculus courses and for applications in other areas.
7. Developing abilities to tackle multi-step problems and to explain the process.
8. Experiencing the potential of modern computer algebra systems (Maple) in assisting the analysis of problems in calculus and the visualization of their solutions.
9. Developing skills in mathematical reasoning.
10. Developing a broad perspective of how various different topics in this course fit together.

Calculator and Maple:

A graphing calculator is required for this class. A TI-89 or TI-92 PLUS is recommended. We will use many of the extra capabilities of these calculators. You can find help and examples prepared by Professor Pence here. We will also use the software package Maple.

Homework:

Homework is assinged in the schedule along with online exercises. You should work on the problems in the book first for practice (not collected) and then do the online exercises for credit.  It is essential that homework be done conscientiously. If you have any questions about problems, please ask them in class or in office hours. Tutor Lab  is also an excellent place to get help. Experience show that the probability of success in a calculus class is very low for the student who does not work the assigned problems conscientiously (and ask about the ones that cause difficulty). Remember the following confucian proverb:

                           I hear, and I forget; I see, and I remember; I do, and I understand.

Quizzes:

Weekly short quizzes will be given, usually on Fridays. They will cover all of the material before the day of the quiz.

No make up quiz will be given. However, I will drop your two worst quizzes.

Final:

The final exam will be given in the last class 10:15-12:15 on Wednesday, April 26.

Grading:

The final is 25%. the quizzes count for 40% and the online homework counts for 35%. This gives a total of 100%.
Grading scale is approximately as follows:
                                    A (88-100%) BA(80-87.99%) B (72-79.99%) CB(64-71.99%)
                                    C(55-63.99%) DC(50-54.99%) D(43-49.99%) E(0-42.99%)

 

 


Math 1230 Tentative Schedule 
Spring 2015
Section Date   Homework Problems
 5.4
1/9
Review: Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
6.1
1/10,12
 1,3,5,7,13,14,15,19,29,31,37,39,45,51,
 
1/13
Skills exam
6.2
 1/17 1,4,6,7,13,16,23,29,31
6.3
1/19
1,4,10,17,20,30,35
6.4
1/20
Quiz 1, 1,3,6,9,13,17
6.5
1/23,24
1,4,7,10,13,16,24
  6.6
1/26
1,3,7,15
 
1/27
Quiz 2,
7.1
1/30
1,3,11,17,19,47,49
7.2
1/31
1,3,5,9,11,18,23,25
7.3
2/2
1,3,5,7,13,17,23,25,37,41
 
2/3
Quiz 3
  7.4
2/6
1,2,3,5,7,9,17
  4.5
2/7
1,2,7,11,17,23,35,51,55
8.1
2/9
1,5,11,17,31
 
2/10
Quiz 4
8.2
2/13,14
1,5,9,19,31,35
8.3
2/16
1,2,4,12,15,20,25
 
2/17
Quiz 5
8.4
2/20,21
1,5,11,15,25,39,49
8.5
  2/23 1,3,9,19,21
 
2/24
Quiz 6
8.7
2/27
1,3,11,17
8.8
2/28
1,5,11,23,25,37,41
 
3/2
Quiz 7
9.1
  3/13 1,7,10,11,20
9.3
3/14
1,2,13,14
9.4
3/16
1,9,10,15
 
3/17
Quiz 8
10.1
3/20,21
1,3,7,9,13,15,17,27,29,47
10.2
3/23
1,3,7,11,15,19,27,35,49
 
3/24
Quiz 9
10.3
3/27,28
1,4,11,15,25
10.4
3/30
1,4,9,25,37,43
 
3/31
Quiz 10
  10.5
4/3,4
1,5,9,17,23,27,45,49
  10.6   4/6 1,3,15,21,34,41
    4/7 Quiz 11
  10.7   4/10,11 1,7,15,27,37,41,50
  10.8   4/13,14 1,4,11,19,23,25
  10.9   4/17,18 1,10,11,14,27
    4/20,21 Quiz 12, Review
    4/26 Final: 10:15am-12:15pm, Wednesday